Upcoming Seminars

Developing Site Stewardship and Monitoring Programs

Registration Closed!

Developing Site Stewardship and Monitoring Programs

When: November 21, 2019 2:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Dr. Della Scott-Ireton is Associate Director for the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) and has spent her career developing public interpretation for submerged archaeological sites and engaging and training citizen scientists to participate in underwater archaeological research and preservation.

Sarah Miller is Director of the Northeast/East Central Regions for FPAN. She created the Cemetery Resource Protection Training (CRPT) program in 2011 that has since graduated 1,400 stewards from 81 trainings statewide, as well as Heritage Monitoring Scouts of Florida (HMS Florida) launched in 2016 that has so far resulted in 432 Scouts monitoring 864 sites in two years.

Della Scott-Ireton and Sarah Miller of the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) invite you to join them to discuss the development and implementation of archaeological site stewardship programs. Heritage managers increasingly rely on dedicated volunteers and concerned stakeholders to serve as citizen scientists in the field, assisting with non-disturbance monitoring and recording of sites threatened by looting, erosion, development, sea level rise, and climate change. FPAN has had success in creating and executing such programs, both on land and under water. Sarah and Della will discuss the impetus for FPAN’s programs, as well as development of training curricula, promotion and marketing, partnering with other agencies, dealing with data, and on-going strategies for attracting, training, and retaining participants. Sustainability is a factor to consider, therefore challenges and opportunities for sustaining these kinds of programs also will be addressed.

  1. To provide information, resources, and support for those wanting to develop effective and sustainable site stewardship/monitoring programs.
  2. To discuss pros and cons, benefits and pitfalls, challenges and solutions of non-disturbance citizen science programs.
  3. To stimulate ideas and offer suggestions for new or similar programs in other areas.

Ancient DNA 101: What You Need to Know to Establish a Successful Project

When: December 03, 2019 12:00-2:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Courtney Hofman is an assistant professor of Anthropology and co-director at the University of Oklahoma's Laboratories of Molecular Anthropology and Microbiome Research. Dr. Hofman has conducted research that integrates interdisciplinary methods and fields, including genomics, ancient DNA, proteomics, and archaeology to explore human-environment interactions on two very different scales. First, she investigates human-wildlife interactions and their influence on changing environments over the past millennia to inform conservation decisions. Second, Dr. Hofman conducts research on the evolution of the human microbiome using dental calculus and paleofeces from archaeological contexts. Dr. Hofman completed her PhD at the University of Maryland in collaboration with the Center for Conservation Genomics at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the Anthropology department at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, where she is also a research associate.

Dr. Christina Warinner earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Harvard University in 2010 and received postdoctoral training in genomics and proteomics at the University of Zurich (2010-2012) and the University of Oklahoma (2012-2014). In 2014, she was appointed Assistant Professor of Anthropology and was awarded a Presidential Research Professorship at the University of Oklahoma (OU). In 2016, she was made W2 Group Leader of Microbiome Sciences at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH), and in 2018 she was promoted to University Professor in the Faculty of Biological Sciences at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. Since 2019, she is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University. Warinner specializes in biomolecular archaeology, with an emphasis on reconstructing the prehistory of human foods and the evolution of the microbiome. She is known for her pioneering work in ancient DNA and proteins research, which has contributed to the study of prehistoric human health, ancestral human oral and gut microbiota, the origins of dairying, and past human migrations. She is a 2012 TED Fellow, and her TED Talks on ancient dental calculus and the evolution of the human diet have been viewed more than 2 million times. In addition to her research, she is actively engaged in public outreach and created the Adventures in Archaeological Science coloring book, now available in thirty languages, including many indigenous and underrepresented languages.

Recent technological advances in genetics, such as high-throughput sequencing (HTS), have radically transformed ancient DNA (aDNA) research, making it more accessible and affordable for archaeologists than ever before. This seminar will provide a brief introduction to the field of paleogenomics, with an emphasis on the range of questions that can be addressed using current technologies, as well as some potential challenges. We will also explore how much an aDNA study actually costs and the role of student training in aDNA labs. Participants will learn how to identify questions that are amenable to genetic analysis and acquire strategies for how to set up successful collaborations with aDNA labs.
  1. Provide an update on major changes in ancient DNA technologies over the past 5 years.
  2. Highlight the range of questions that current ancient DNA methods can investigate.
  3. Address challenges in ancient DNA research, such as sample preservation and data authentication.
  4. Provide strategies for identifying potential research partners and establishing successful collaborations with aDNA labs.
  5. Discuss the structural differences between how research and training is conducted within the fields of archaeology and genetics, and how this impacts ancient DNA research.
  6. Establish the importance of hypothesis-driven research, and dispel the “Doing the DNA” myth.

Deaccessioning Archaeological Collections

When: December 10, 2019 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


S. Terry Childs recently retired as the manager of the Department of the Interior Museum Program that provides policy, oversight, training, and technical assistance to the ten DOI bureaus and offices that own over 206 million museum objects and archives. She has advocated for attention to archaeological collections curation, preservation, and use through numerous books and articles since she began working for the National Park Service’s Archeology Program in 1993. She is the primary author of the Federal regulations on the disposal and deaccessioning of federal archaeological collections proposed to be added to 36 CFR 79, the Curation of Federally-Owned and Administered Archeological Collections. These proposed regulations were issued in November 2014 for public comment, which she then revised based on the numerous comments received. The National Park Service is currently working to publish those regulations as final. Childs also was the first Chair of the SAA Committee on Curation, now Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation, in 2000-2006; served on the SAA Board of Directors in 2013-2016; and chaired the Archaeological Collections Consortium in 2017-2018.

Jenna Domeischel is the curator of the Blackwater Draw Museum at Eastern New Mexico University in Portales, New Mexico where she has implemented several deaccessions. She has served on The Society for American Archaeology’s (SAA) Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation, and is currently a member of the Archaeological Collections Consortium, a multi-agency national task force concerned with archaeological curation. Jenna is also the founder and chair of the SAA Curation Interest Group.

Deaccessioning is a collections management tool that is available for wise and judicious removal of archaeological collections. This two-hour seminar is designed to help archaeologists, curators, collections managers, repository managers, and others make good decisions about the appropriateness of a potential deaccession and both the means and the steps necessary to implement a deaccession of archaeological collections or objects. Critical to decision-making is knowledge about the ownership of the archaeological material proposed to be deaccessioned and pertinent laws and policies. Case studies of successful deaccessions will be presented.
  1. Learn to assess whether or not to deaccession archaeological materials and what tools are necessary to make good decisions.
  2. Learn the steps involved in deaccessioning, including who should be involved, the need to document every step, and the costs involved.
  3. Learn the opportunities afforded by the deaccessioning process, including curatorial and educational benefits.

Fundamentals of Radiocarbon Dating

When: December 16, 2019 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


As Assistant Research Scientist at the Center for Applied Isotope Studies at the University of Georgia (CAIS-UGA), Carla S. Hadden is responsible for the preparation, analysis, and reporting of over 4,000 radiocarbon samples each year at one of the largest radiocarbon dating laboratories in North America. She regularly publishes on radiocarbon method development and archaeological applications in high-impact journals such as Science Advances, American Antiquity, and Radiocarbon, and is regularly called upon to peer review manuscript submissions on radiocarbon dating and Bayesian chronological modeling in archaeology. Dr. Hadden co-organized the 9th International Symposium on Radiocarbon and Archaeology, a 5-day event attended by over 100 archaeologists and radiocarbon researchers representing 25 countries. She currently serves as an Associate Editor for Radiocarbon, the main international journal of record for research articles relevant to radiocarbon techniques used in archaeological, geophysical, oceanographic, and related dating. She also regularly guest lectures and hosts lab tours and workshops at CAIS-UGA on the topic of radiocarbon dating.
Radiocarbon dating is one of the most important tools for chronology building in archaeology. The purpose of this seminar is to provide archaeologists with a practical primer on radiocarbon dating, with a focus on best practices in sample selection, data reporting, and interpretation. The intended audience includes students, academic faculty, and professional archaeologists who incorporate radiocarbon dating in their research design or are responsible for disseminating the results of such research. The seminar will highlight strategies for evaluating sample quality based on context, preservation, and material type; provide a detailed explanation of the conventions and requirements for reporting uncalibrated and calibrated radiocarbon dates; and review the most common mistakes and misconceptions in interpreting radiocarbon data.
  1. Identify what constitutes a “good” or “bad” sample for dating;
  2. Understand how to follow the conventions for reporting radiocarbon data in technical reports and scientific journals;
  3. Use the calibration curve to convert conventional radiocarbon dates to calibrated calendar dates and to identify time periods that are likely to yield ambiguous/low-precision calibrated dates;
  4. Assess the quality of published “legacy data” by evaluating sample context, material type, and associated metadata; and
  5. Avoid common mistakes and pitfalls in interpreting and communicating radiocarbon dates.