Seminars On-Demand

SAA offers free-to-member and fee-based online seminars every year, but there may be content that you've missed. Seminars On-Demand provides the opportunity to purchase access to past seminar recordings. This comes with many of the same advantages as live online seminars. Participants will receive access to the video recording for two months, two RPA Continuing Professional Education credit hours, and a certificate of completion.

After completing your purchase, you will receive an email from SAA staff with a link to the recording. Please allow one business day to complete this process. If you chose the group registration option, you will also receive information about providing access to your group (there is no maximum to the number of people who can be in your group).

Please note that you are not registering for a live event, but rather purchasing access to a past recording.

If you are an SAA member, you also have access to 30+ hours of free on-demand recordings in the Online Learning Archive. Log in to the Member Center and start learning!

Current On-Demand Options

Exploring Applications of 3-D Printing in Archaeology for Education, Public Outreach, and Museum Exhibits

Recording Date: June 02, 2022

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Bernard K. Means, PhD, RPA, Virginia Commonwealth University

Dr. Means's scholarly pursuits include reconstructing American Indian village spatial and social organizations, the research potential of archaeological collections, and the history of archaeology across the Americas, especially during the Great Depression. Dr. Means is also director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory, which is creating three-dimensional (3-D) digital models of historical, archaeological and paleontological objects used for teaching, research, and public outreach from across the Americas as well as northern India. He has 3-D scanned Ice Age animal bones from across North America, including some that were collected by Thomas Jefferson and a mastodon tooth that belonged to Ben Franklin and found in Philadelphia. Dr. Means is the author of Circular Villages of the Monongahela Tradition (2007) and editor of and contributor to the Shovel Ready: Archaeology and Roosevelt’s New Deal for America (2013), as well as numerous articles on the Monongahela tradition, New Deal archaeology, and applications of three dimensional (3-D) scanning and printing to archaeology, especially public outreach.

Three-dimensional (3-D) printing is increasingly infiltrating all aspects of society, from manufacturing and medicine to STEM education on K-12 levels. This seminar will explore the basics of 3-D printing and how archaeologists can integrate 3-D models and printed materials into all aspects of their discipline, from the field to the laboratory, and into the classroom and the museum. Particular attention will be paid to the following areas:

  • how digital 3-D models enhance identification of artifacts and ecofacts in the field and laboratory over 2-D drawings or photographs
  • how 3-D printed replicas expand opportunities for teaching and research at all levels of education, but especially for undergraduate teaching
  • how 3-D printed replicas can be incorporated into public outreach programs, maximizing access to the past, while minimizing risks to fragile heritage
  • how 3-D printed replicas can be integrated into museum exhibits to create a more interactive and tactile element

The 3-D printed past is not something from the far-off archaeology future, but should be seen as very much a part of the archaeological present.

1. Describe the basic types of 3-D printers and finding a cost-effective solution to 3-D printing needs
2. Explain where to find or how to create your own digital 3-D archaeological models for printing
3. Explore ways to integrate 3-D printed replicas into all aspects of archaeological pedagogy and outreach

Step by Step: Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act

Recording Date: January 27, 2022

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Kimball Banks, RPA, is an experienced practitioner of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Much of that experience was gained in the federal sector, working for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Bureau of Reclamation. His work in both agencies involved working with tribes. He organized and held several workshops for tribes on both NHPA and NEPA. In addition, he is an expert on P.L. 93-638 - the Indian Self Determination and Education and Assistance Act. This law give tribes the option to assume the activities necessary to comply with NHPA and NEPA with respect to federal projects or programs for tribes.

J. Signe Snortland holds a B.A. from the University of North Dakota and a M.A. from the University of Manitoba in Anthropology. Snortland is an experienced NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) and Section 106 (National Historic Preservation Act) practitioner, as well as a former manager of a federal office. She has led teams preparing environmental impact statements (EISs) in Colorado, North Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, and Washington. She served as an Environmental Specialist and Area Archaeologist for the U.S Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation. Previously she was the Chief Archeologist for the State Historical Society of North Dakota (NDSHPO) and conducted thousands of Section 106 reviews.
This course is a deep dive into the steps required for compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and its integration into the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The instructors will cover the roles and responsibilities of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, lead federal agency, SHPO, THPO, tribes, consultants, and consulting parties in each step. They will also discuss NEPA in Indian Country in respect to Public Law 93-638, the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act.

Please keep in mind that this recording is a snapshot in time, and regulations may change.
1. Understanding roles, responsibilities, and steps in Section 106 (NHPA) compliance.
2. Learning the relationship between NHPA and NEPA.
3. Increasing awareness of NHPA and NEPA in Indian Country.

Historic Ceramics Identification

Recording Date: October 05, 2021

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Dr. Lindsay Bloch has over 15 years experience as a historical archaeologist, focusing on ceramics manufacture and use. She has collaborated for many years with the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (DAACS), overseeing the identification and cataloging of 17th-20th C. site assemblages. DAACS has developed one of the most detailed cataloging procedures for historical ceramics. She is well versed in historic pottery made in Great Britain, as well as continental Europe and North America, and has analyzed collections from British, Spanish, and French colonial contexts. Dr. Bloch currently runs the Tempered Archaeological Services, LLC, where she routinely identifies artifacts and conducts trainings for the archaeological community, as well as performing a variety of specialized analyses.
Accurate identification of ceramic types is foundational to historical archaeology, given the ubiquity of ceramics on sites and the importance of ceramic change over time for establishing site chronology. There are a variety of different approaches to identification, emphasizing origin, decoration, or production method. This seminar will use a technology-based approach, teaching how to identify how an object was made, given the strong relationships between manufacture, and geographic and temporal variation. The seminar will cover the 4 main ceramic materials (coarse earthenware, refined earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain), outline the characteristics of the primary manufacturing techniques, and discuss broad trends in decorative motifs/techniques. This approach will provide participants with a toolkit for identifying wares they may encounter, based on key diagnostic features.
  1. Distinguish four main ceramic materials (coarse earthenware, refined earthenware, stoneware, porcelain)
  2. Recognize technological change in pottery production through time
  3. Recognize decorative change in pottery production through time

Introduction to Bayesian Chronological Modeling

Recording Date: December 03, 2020

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Carla Hadden is an Assistant Research Scientist in the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory at the University of Georgia Center for Applied Isotope Studies. Dr. Hadden specializes in radiocarbon dating, environmental archaeology, and zooarchaeology, and is an Associate Editor for Radiocarbon, the main international journal of record for research articles relevant to radiocarbon techniques. She regularly publishes on radiocarbon method development and archaeological applications in high-impact journals such as Science Advances, American Antiquity, and Radiocarbon, and is regularly called upon to peer review manuscript submissions on radiocarbon dating and Bayesian chronological modeling in archaeology.

Bayesian chronological modeling revolutionized chronology building in archaeology. It provided a robust mathematical framework for incorporating all the dating information available, including radiocarbon dates, stratigraphy, artifact typologies, and the written historical record. The purpose of this seminar is to provide archaeologists with an introduction to the key concepts, assumptions, and terminology used in Bayesian chronological modeling; an overview of the basic structures and applications of age models; and an introduction to the “iterative approach” to sample selection and chronological modeling. We will introduce the audience to the several software options available for age modeling (OxCal, BCal, and various packages implemented in R) and compare their pros and cons. We will not provide a step-by-step “how to” for constructing models in any one program, but participants will receive a workbook and “quick start” guide for modeling in OxCal. This course will enable participants to understand and evaluate age models that they encounter in archaeological literature; will provide a necessary foundation for those interested in exploring how Bayesian models could contribute to their own projects; and will provide resources for those who wish to learn more about constructing chronological models. The intended audience includes those who have no previous experience in Bayesian chronological modeling.

  1. Understand the basic terminology related to Bayesian chronological modeling, e.g., event; phase; sequence; boundary; MCMC; prior probability; posterior probability; likelihood; parameter; convergence; agreement
  2. Evaluate and interpret model outputs
  3. Understand and follow the conventions for reporting modeled dates in technical reports and scientific journals

Perishable Material Culture: An Introduction to Analysis and Documentation

Recording Date: February 04, 2021

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Dr. Edward A. Jolie, RPA, is the director of the Perishable Artifact Laboratory at Mercyhurst University, one of only a handful of labs globally that specializes in the documentation and analysis of perishable material culture such as string, textiles, baskets, nets, and footwear. His scholarly interests include the archaeology of the Americas (with particular reference to the western U.S.), sociocultural diversity in the past and present, perishable material culture worldwide, Native American-Anthropologist relationships, and ethics in anthropology. Being of mixed Oglala Lakota (Sioux) and Hodulgee Muscogee ancestry, and an enrolled citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, he strives to cultivate collaborative relationships and research partnerships with descendant communities.

Perishable material culture, including items such as string, nets, baskets, mats, footwear, and clothing, has been critical to human lives and livelihoods for tens of millennia, but has historically suffered from a lack of scholarly attention owing to the biases of preservation and gender. This seminar introduces participants to the diversity of perishable material culture that they may encounter in field and museum settings and provides a foundation for pursuing more intensive research on these objects. The instructor will place particular emphasis on the essential knowledge required for the proper recognition, handling, basic analysis, and documentation of perishable artifacts.

  1. Improve knowledge of the recognition and proper handling of perishable material culture.
  2. Explore the basic structural and analytical attributes of the major technological classes of perishable material culture.
  3. Establish the basics of perishable artifact analysis and documentation.

Grant and Research Proposal Writing for Archaeologists

Recording Date: March 05, 2019

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


As a professor at Boston University, John M. Marston has designed and taught a formal course for advanced doctoral students titled “Proposal Writing for Social Science Research,” in which students write from scratch actual research proposals for their doctoral research (e.g., NSF Dissertation Improvement Grants). Dr. Marston has taught a number of workshops on grant writing at Boston University and UCLA, and at UCLA served as a graduate writing consultant for the Graduate Writing Center, at which he designed and taught several workshops on writing graduate fellowship proposals. He has been the sole author or co-author of grants funded by a number of leading granting agencies and organizations, including the NSF, SSHRC, National Geographic, American Philosophical Society, and others.

This two-hour online seminar will provide archaeologists with basic advice on how to craft successful grant proposals to funding agencies (e.g., NSF) and organizations (e.g., National Geographic). The intended audience is those who are applying to such organizations for the first time or who are attempting to improve their success at attracting public funding for their research. The seminar will highlight a number of strategies for reading and responding to proposal calls, to structuring effective project narratives of varying lengths, to strengthening a proposal with supplementary information, and to revising a proposal based on reviewer feedback. It will provide examples of application strategies appropriate to funding opportunities available at multiple career stages, from those open to doctoral students to those intended for senior scholars.

  1. Be able to read a call for proposals to understand what is required for a given funding opportunity;
  2. Be familiar with what is expected for typical components of grant applications;
  3. Be able to apply a tailored strategy to craft a strong project narrative for a variety of funding opportunities;
  4. Gain strategies for successful revision and reuse of proposals, following review.

Deaccessioning Archaeological Collections

Recording Date: December 10, 2019

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


S. Terry Childs recently retired as the manager of the Department of the Interior Museum Program that provides policy, oversight, training, and technical assistance to the ten DOI bureaus and offices that own over 206 million museum objects and archives. She has advocated for attention to archaeological collections curation, preservation, and use through numerous books and articles since she began working for the National Park Service’s Archeology Program in 1993. She is the primary author of the Federal regulations on the disposal and deaccessioning of federal archaeological collections proposed to be added to 36 CFR 79, the Curation of Federally-Owned and Administered Archeological Collections. These proposed regulations were issued in November 2014 for public comment, which she then revised based on the numerous comments received. The National Park Service is currently working to publish those regulations as final. Childs also was the first Chair of the SAA Committee on Curation, now Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation, in 2000-2006; served on the SAA Board of Directors in 2013-2016; and chaired the Archaeological Collections Consortium in 2017-2018.

Jenna Domeischel is the curator of the Blackwater Draw Museum at Eastern New Mexico University in Portales, New Mexico where she has implemented several deaccessions. She has served on The Society for American Archaeology’s (SAA) Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation, and is currently a member of the Archaeological Collections Consortium, a multi-agency national task force concerned with archaeological curation. Jenna is also the founder and chair of the SAA Curation Interest Group.

Deaccessioning is a collections management tool that is available for wise and judicious removal of archaeological collections. This two-hour seminar is designed to help archaeologists, curators, collections managers, repository managers, and others make good decisions about the appropriateness of a potential deaccession and both the means and the steps necessary to implement a deaccession of archaeological collections or objects. Critical to decision-making is knowledge about the ownership of the archaeological material proposed to be deaccessioned and pertinent laws and policies. Case studies of successful deaccessions will be presented.
  1. Learn to assess whether or not to deaccession archaeological materials and what tools are necessary to make good decisions.
  2. Learn the steps involved in deaccessioning, including who should be involved, the need to document every step, and the costs involved.
  3. Learn the opportunities afforded by the deaccessioning process, including curatorial and educational benefits.