Past Seminars

How to Prepare for a Job in CRM

Registration Closed!

How to Prepare for a Job in CRM

When: February 07, 2019 2:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Both instructors are employed as full time permanent CRM archaeologists, with different backgrounds, years of experience, and regional specializations. Sarah Herr has 20+ years of CRM experience in the US Southwest and has a Ph.D. level education. LK Schnitzer has 5+ years of CRM experience in the US Southeast and an M.A. level education. Their different backgrounds will allow the instructors to cover topics from multiple perspectives for a well-rounded seminar.

This seminar provides a crash course in how to prepare for a job in CRM archaeology. It will begin by defining Cultural Resources Management, the laws that regulate it, and the types of archaeology jobs it necessitates. The seminar will then split into separate discussions about temporary vs. permanent jobs in CRM, with a focus on educational and professional prerequisites, technical skills, where to look for employment, how to attract an employer’s attention, and how CRM archaeology varies across the country and by phase.  The instructors will also provide resources on the importance of non-technical or “soft” skills and safe and respectful workplaces.

  1. Introduce anthropology/archaeology students to the field of CRM
  2. Help students decide if CRM is a career path they are interested in
  3. Provide information about education and skills necessary to attain a job in CRM

The Context and Consequence of Sexual Harassment in Archaeology

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The Context and Consequence of Sexual Harassment in Archaeology

When: January 29, 2019 3:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Maureen Meyers is an assistant professor at the University of Mississippi in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Prior to working in academia, she worked as a Principal Investigator for three different CRM firms for 7 years, and she has also worked at the Florida Museum of Natural History, the National Park Service, the National Forest Service, and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Plant as an archaeologist. In 2013, she initiated the Southeastern Archaeological Conference (SEAC) Sexual Harassment Survey and formed a committee to assist in creating and implementing the survey and analyzing the data. The survey opened in 2014, and the results published in the SEAC Newsletter and most recently in Advances in Archaeological Practice. As a result of this work, Dr. Meyers has also served on the SAA Sexual Harassment Survey Committee and served as a Peer Reviewer for the National Park Service Sexual Harassment Survey and report on the survey results. She is also the President-Elect of SEAC. Her research focuses on chiefly frontiers, Mississippian societies, craft production, and settlement.

Although there is a long-standing history of harassment in archaeology, recent surveys have quantified the rate of harassment and assault and the effects on women’s careers for the first time. Based on these data, sexual harassment and assault appear to be one important reason women leave the field. Harassment and assault may also contribute to the recently documented decreased publication and grant submission rates by women. This course will provide an overview of the results of the 2014 Southeastern Archaeological Conference (SEAC) Sexual Harassment Survey. It discusses the consequences of harassment and assault on the field of archaeology in general. It concludes with a discussion of education programs and proposed grievance procedures to decrease and mitigate sexual harassment and assault within archaeology.

  1. Understand the need for sexual harassment and assault surveys in archaeology
  2. Learn about the rate of harassment and assault as quantified in the 2014 SEAC survey and understand the long-term effects of this on women’s careers and the discipline as a whole
  3. Learn possible procedures to mitigate and decrease the rates of harassment and assault in archaeology

Metals Managed: Using X-radiography to Identify, Document, and Sample Corroded Iron

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Metals Managed: Using X-radiography to Identify, Document, and Sample Corroded Iron

When: January 24, 2019 2:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Sara Rivers-Cofield has been the Curator of Federal Collections at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) for 14 years, working alongside conservators to develop a survey and x-radiography strategy that allows the MAC lab to comply with the requirements of 36 CFR Part 79: Curation of Federally Owned and Administered Archaeological Collections. Rivers Cofield specializes in the identification and interpretation of metal artifacts. She is the Chair of the Curation and Collections Committee for the Society for Historical Archaeology, a member of the Society for American Archaeology’s Curation Interest Group, and Co-Chair of the Archaeological Curation Consortium, a cooperative group comprised of collections professionals from SAA, SHA, and ACRA.

Kerry S. González has been involved with collections management for over a decade, primarily serving as Dovetail’s lab manager where she ensures quality control throughout the entire curation process, assists with detailed analysis of archaeological collections and authors a monthly ‘Featured Fragment blog’ on artifacts recovered from Dovetail excavations. For the past few years she has worked towards creating awareness among CRM professionals of the utility of x-radiography for assessing and interpreting archaeological collections through presenting papers at conferences, authoring a chapter in an edited volume on the utility of x-ray, as well as being an instructor for two x-ray workshops. She is a member of the collections management committees for Society for Historical Archaeology, the Council for Virginia Archaeologists, and the American Cultural Resource Association.

Archaeologists are in need of better strategies for managing assemblages of corroded metal artifacts, especially nails. There is an affordable middle ground between storing artifacts that will never be properly identified or conserved, and discarding without proper documentation and identification. X-radiography is a cost-effective method for identifying artifacts obscured by corrosion, documenting diagnostic attributes, and helping collections managers and conservators work together to prioritize artifacts for treatment. This seminar will cover the applications of x-radiography for archaeological collections managers, with a specific focus on cost savings. The program instructors will share their experiences using x-rays to create more accurate artifact catalogs and craft responsible discard strategies which reduce curation fees and result in cost savings for the overall project budget. Disclaimer: we are not conservators, so when it comes to the technical side of x-ray, like what settings to use, etc., you need to work with someone who has that expertise. We do not do the x-rays, but we are all about the applications of x-rays for metals.

  1. Participants will learn how to “read” an artifact x-ray (how much core metal is present, what kind of metal is it, what do artifacts look like in two dimensions, etc.)
  2. Participants will learn how to use x-rays as documentation of bulk metals (i.e. nails) so that these can be discarded with minimal loss of important analytical information.
  3. Participants will learn about the availability of x-radiography services, the costs of these services, and how obtaining x-rays can lead to cost savings for CRM projects.

Forensic Archaeology: Theory and Practice

Registration Closed!

Forensic Archaeology: Theory and Practice

When: December 11, 2018 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $139 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $179 for non-members


Kimberlee Sue Moran, MSc, RPA has been an archaeologist, educator, and forensic consultant since 2002. She holds an undergraduate degree in archaeology from Bryn Mawr College and a Master of Science degree in forensic archaeological science from the Institute of Archaeology at University College London. Kimberlee has worked on a number of cases in a range of capacities both in the UK and US. She provides forensic services and training to legal professionals. She helped to launch the JDI Centre for the Forensic Sciences in 2010 and has run an educational organization, Forensic Outreach, since 2004. Kimberlee is a member of the CSI sub-committee, part of the Organization of Scientific Area Committees under the National Institute for Science and Technology (NIST) tasked with establishing standards of best practice for forensic science.  She is an Associate Teaching Professor and Director of Forensic Science at Rutgers University – Camden.

This two-hour seminar will introduce participants to the intersection of archaeological and forensic methods and techniques.  Through this course, participants will learn the ways that archaeology can provide standards of best practice for crime scene investigation. Participants will become familiar with both the theory behind forensic archaeology as well as the methods that distinguish it from other forms of archaeology.  Finally, the seminar will discuss the forensic recovery of human remains using archaeological techniques in order to maximize evidence recovery at outdoor crime scenes.

  1. Understand and be able to articulate the core theoretical concepts that form the foundation of forensic archaeology today
  2. Understand how an outdoor scene should be processed using archaeological methods and how human remains should be excavated to ensure optimal evidence recovery
  3. Be familiar with the tools, techniques, and data sources necessary for empirical analysis of environmental evidence
  4. Be able to apply their understanding of core concepts and practical tools to the evaluation of real-world casework, including current crime scene processing procedures for outdoor scenes and clandestine grave excavation, and assess the practicality of utilizing environmental evidence

 


Newer Developments in Technologies for the Measurement of Form and Space in Archaeology: Part II

Registration Closed!

Newer Developments in Technologies for the Measurement of Form and Space in Archaeology: Part II

When: December 06, 2018 2:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Fred Limp has been involved in the application of geomatics methods to archaeology for more than three decades. He was the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies for 18 years. He has served as PI or Co-PI on four major NSF projects applying geomatics to archaeology and heritage management and in 2013 he was appointed by Interior Secretary Salazar to the Board of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training.  He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate and short courses on the topic. He is a past-President of the SAA and was a founding Director of the Open Geospatial Consortium. OGC is the international body that developed spatial data interoperability specifications

More than 60 years ago, Gordon Willey famously stated that the objectives of archaeology are “approached by the study and manipulation of three basic factors: form, space and time.” Since then, we have seen the huge impact that improved technologies for the measurement of time have had on the field. We are currently in the midst of a similar revolution in the methods for the measurement of space and form. This lecture updates one first offered by SAA in 2014 and is designed as a state-of-the-art introduction to these developments, specifically for archaeology students.

As a two-part series, Part II of this course examines analysis, display, and dissemination of High-Density Survey and Measurement (HDSM) data. Building on Part I, this lecture also provides further considerations and strategies for choosing the “best” approach in using these technologies.

Completing Part I of this course is not a requirement, but it is encouraged. Members can listen to Part I in the SAA Online Seminar Series Archive, available in the Member Center.

  1. Define characteristics and archaeological and heritage management uses of new technologies and methods in high density survey (HDSM) methods (typically sub-millimeter to centimeter)
  2. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches in consideration to specific project limitations
  3. Describe the general process and tools of extraction, analysis, display, and dissemination of HDSM data.