Past Seminars

Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones

Registration Closed!

Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones

When: November 04, 2019 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Dr. April M. Beisaw has worked as an independent faunal analyst since completing her MA thesis in 1998. She is the author of Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones: A Manual, published by Texas A&M University Press in 2013.

Valerie Hall is a graduate student at the University of Maryland. She is currently working as an independent faunal analyst with collections from Historic St. Mary’s City, MD; Monticello in Charlottesville, VA; and Charleston, NC. Her dissertation research explores environmental change related to the importation of domestic livestock during the colonial period.
This introductory seminar will cover both techniques for identifying bone fragments and some basic interpretive analyses that can be done using only a spreadsheet application. Participants will be provided with a series of example bone images and faunal data so we can work through the process together. Emphasis will be on mammal and bird bone identification but fish, reptile, and amphibian may be included in the shared dataset. Related data such as habitat preferences of identified species will be used to develop an interpretation of the example collection.
  1. Gain experience identifying fragmentary faunal remains to taxonomic class, if not genus or species.
  2. Manipulate basic faunal data to calculate minimum numbers of individuals, numbers of
    identified specimens, and assess spatial patterning across a site.
  3. Use inferential data such as habitat preferences of identified animals to interpret the collection.

Introduction to Archaeological Damage Assessment

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Introduction to Archaeological Damage Assessment

When: October 23, 2019 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Forensic Archaeologist Martin McAllister, MA, RPA, has been involved in archaeological damage assessment since 1974,when he worked with the Forest Service. After leaving the Forest Service in 1985, McAllister formed the firm of Archaeological Damage Assessment & Investigation (ADIA) which specialized in consulting and training on archaeological damage assessment and the investigation and prosecution of archaeological violations. In 2015, ADIA became part of Northland Research,Inc.,an archaeological contracting firm based in Arizona. He now works for Cogstone Resource Management, Inc. McAllister has conducted or been directly involved in 38 archaeological damage assessment projects, including the archaeological damage assessment for the Exxon-Valdez Oil Spill. He is also the author of National Park Service Technical Brief 20 entitled Archeological Resource Damage Assessment: Legal Basis and Methods.

Brent Kober is a Forensic Archaeologist with the Cogstone Resource Management, Inc. He has been a professional Archaeologist for 22 years. He has performed archaeological damage assessments and has taught forensic archaeological methodology throughout the United States alongside nationally recognized expert Martin McAllister for the last five years.

This online seminar is intended for professional archaeologists employed by government agencies or archaeological contracting firms. It will provide participants with an introduction to archaeological damage assessment. After presenting a basic definition of archaeological damage assessment, it will review the legal elements for criminal and civil prosecution of violations of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA). Next, there will be discussions of (1) Federal Rule of Evidence 702 for expert witness testimony; (2) the professional standards for archaeological damage assessment; and (3) development of a damage assessment strategy. This will be followed by an introduction to the components of archaeological damage assessment, including, for each component, identification of the purpose, responsibilities, time requirements, and basic procedures. The seminar will conclude with a brief discussion of the importance of the professional qualifications and the time and labor commitments necessary to meet the legal standards for expert witness testimony.

  1. Understand the basic purpose of archaeological damage assessment;
  2. Understand the legal and professional standards for archaeological damage assessment, including Federal Rule of Evidence 702 for expert witness testimony;
  3. Understand the components of archaeological damage assessment; and 
  4. Understand the professional qualifications necessary to conduct each of the components of archaeological damage assessment and the time and labor requirements involved.

Persuasive Writing for the Public

Registration Closed!

Persuasive Writing for the Public

When: October 16, 2019 1:00-2:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; not available to non-members

Group Registration: 


Nicola Jones received a Masters in Journalism from UBC (2000), and then went on to work at New Scientist Magazine and Nature in London. At Nature, she served as a news and features reporter and editor; online news editor; and commentary editor. She has been working with SAPIENS since 2017, developing and editing many essays and opinion pieces by anthropologists for a general audience.

Learn how (and why) to write about your work for the public, from an expert editor. Nicola Jones has spent more than a decade editing essays by academics, originally for the science journal Nature, and more recently for the online anthropology magazine SAPIENS (www.sapiens.org). Nicola will walk you through the steps of how, when, and to whom to pitch an essay or opinion piece; how to frame an argument; and how to write in a compelling and persuasive way for the general public.

  1. Discover different ways that writing for the public can help your career
  2. Learn how to pitch an essay or opinion piece
  3. Learn how to write compellingly and persuasively for the general public

XRF in Archaeology: Overview of Fundamental Concepts and Case Studies

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XRF in Archaeology: Overview of Fundamental Concepts and Case Studies

When: October 11, 2019 1:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


As a practicing archaeologist at FAR Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc., Dr. Lucas R. M. Johnson applies XRF analysis to obsidian, other volcanic rocks, and other materials in conventional and often creative ways. Conventional analysis of obsidian includes knowledge of statistical methods in terms of sourcing small and thin artifacts and producing technical reports. Other analyses have included residues/pigments on ritualized materials (e.g., ochre versus cinnabar), historic era ceramic glazes, and general sourcing of metavolcanic ground stone. Dr. Johnson understands how to characterize a wide range of elements and their respective concentrations if present. As a member of a laboratory team, Dr. Johnson has stayed current with XRF literature describing analyses of various materials, taught other lab staff the fundamentals of XRF, and trained them to use an XRF instrument.

Applications of X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) in archaeology have expanded beyond the analysis of homogenous materials, such as obsidian, to include more heterogenous materials used, created, formed, or associated with human practices. Applications therefore include characterizations of ceramics, metals, glasses, soils, sediments, plasters, pigments/residues, cherts, and metavolcanic or metasedimentary rocks. While obsidian analysis is relatively straightforward, the other materials require additional caveats before conclusions can be drawn. This webinar summarizes fundamental aspects of how XRF works and then discusses a series of case-studies to illustrate how XRF technology can be applied to various anthropological questions. Intended for students, with little to no hands-on XRF experience, the presentation outlines important technical topics that should be considered before using XRF. These include a critical evaluation of material, the limitations of XRF instruments, and how XRF spectral data are used to make inferences and conclusions. Through discussing these topics, the instructor will indirectly address current debates in the literature regarding the use, reliability, and accuracy of handheld portable instruments. Regardless of which instrument is used, considerations of reliability, accuracy, and precision are essential.

  1. Understand what is required for XRF analysis of a given material and by extension understand the limitations of XRF in analyzing certain materials.
  2. Present case-studies by which students may learn how to perform a specific analysis.
  3. Understand the fundamental physics of XRF and how software transforms XRF spectral to analytical units (i.e., calibrations).
  4. Understand the basics of analyzing parts per million or weight percent versus untransformed photon peak counts (i.e., statistical procedures).

International Heritage Management

Registration Closed!

International Heritage Management

When: September 26, 2019 12:00-2:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Gerry Wait has over 30 years of experience as an archaeologist and heritage consultant. His real passion is in finding ways to make the past relevant to people and communities in building their future, with the belief that successful communities have firm roots in their past. Gerry is an expert in conservation and management planning, and has led Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (ESIAs) or IESC due diligence in the UK, USA, Romania, Ireland, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Burkino Faso, Niger, the Mauretania, Republic of Congo, Mongolia, Morocco, and Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Turkey, and Bulgaria, Albania, Greece, Uganda and Tanzania.

Gerry served as Chairman of the UK’s Institute for Archaeologists and a number of terms on the Board of CIfA, and is Co-Chair of the Committee on Professional Associations in Archaeology of the European Association of Archaeologists. Gerry has a B.A. in Anthropology, a M.A. in Anthropology and Archaeology, and a PhD in European Archaeology from the University of Oxford. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, the International Association for Impact Assessment, and of many other professional and academic associations.

International Cultural Heritage Management (ICHM), like heritage management in any context, can seem romantic and simultaneously like a great deal of work. Above all, it can be immensely rewarding. This two-hour course will provide participants with an introduction to the ways in which ICHM is like and unlike domestic Cultural Heritage Management work in other contexts. The seminar will discuss ethics and standards and team-work/collaboration in cross-cultural contexts. Outputs, capacity building, and sectoral development will also be discussed. Participants will learn about available resources for finding best practices and sources for support and guidance and be pointed to the existence and use of standards and publications.

Participants will be better able to assemble and lead teams or contribute as team members by:

  1. Learning how to work through ethical concerns arising from working internationally in different cultural contexts;
  2. Identifying the basic issues of international team management – cultural differences, time keeping, team roles and management, and styles of communication;
  3. Connecting the relationships between standards of performance, outputs (project, commercial and academic) and capacity building; and
  4. Learning how to find resources and support/guidance.