Past Seminars

Exploring Power Dynamics, Responsibility, and Accountability in Archaeological Practice: Part I

Registration Closed!

Exploring Power Dynamics, Responsibility, and Accountability in Archaeological Practice: Part I

When: October 12, 2021 2:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; $69 for non-members

Group Registration: Free to SAA members; $89 for non-members


Laura Heath-Stout is co-chair of the SAA Committee on Meeting Safety. Her intersectional research on diversity and equity issues in archaeology (including sexual misconduct and bullying) has been published in American Antiquity, Advances in Archaeological Practice, and the Journal of Field Archaeology and formed the basis for her dissertation (2019, Boston University). This work led to her participation in the SAA’s 2019 Task Force on Sexual and Anti-Harassment Policies and Procedures, which successfully advocated for the creation of the Meeting Safety Committee. Dr. Heath-Stout, Meagan Thies-Sauder, and Gabriela Oré Menéndez collaborated with Futures Without Violence in 2020–2021 to develop the curriculum of this series of seminars, which they first presented as a workshop at the 2021 SAA Annual Meeting. Her research and service work is informed by her experiences as a queer, disabled, white, upper-middle-class, cisgender woman and survivor of sexual harassment and bullying in archaeological professional contexts.

Meagan Thies-Sauder is a member of the SAA Committee on Meeting Safety. Over the past seven years, she has worked with archaeologists across North America and beyond to address sexual misconduct and bullying in archaeology through leading forums, serving on task forces, giving talks, and conducting advocacy. It is her hope that all archaeologists are willing and able to access the information, tools, and resources developed to establish a professional and ethical environment for archaeological practice.

This workshop was created by the SAA Meeting Safety Committee in collaboration with Futures Without Violence to identify, address, and prevent sexual misconduct and bullying in archaeological practice. The group facilitators will use this, the first of two seminars, to inform the group on the role power dynamics play in sexual misconduct and bullying and ways to address and prevent it in the workplace. There will also be a Part II presented one week later, in which the group facilitators will lead the group through a series of prompted questions to explore power dynamics, responsibility, and accountability in their respective work environments and where the skills acquired in the first section can be implemented. Both sessions will include elements about self-care in order to support participants in discussing and facing these difficult topics in the workshop and beyond.

Help participants to:

  1. Identify a variety of forms of power dynamics and harassment, ranging from microaggressions to sexual assault
  2. Safely and effectively intervene when they see harassment happening
  3. Generate ideas and skills for improving the safety of their workplaces, research projects, and classrooms

Historic Ceramics Identification

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Historic Ceramics Identification

When: October 05, 2021 1:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Dr. Lindsay Bloch has over 15 years experience as a historical archaeologist, focusing on ceramics manufacture and use. She has collaborated for many years with the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (DAACS), overseeing the identification and cataloging of 17th-20th C. site assemblages. DAACS has developed one of the most detailed cataloging procedures for historical ceramics. She is well versed in historic pottery made in Great Britain, as well as continental Europe and North America, and has analyzed collections from British, Spanish, and French colonial contexts. Dr. Bloch currently runs the Ceramic Technology Laboratory at the Florida Museum (University of Florida) where she routinely identifies artifacts and conducts trainings for the archaeological community, as well as performing a variety of specialized analyses.

Accurate identification of ceramic types is foundational to historical archaeology, given the ubiquity of ceramics on sites and the importance of ceramic change over time for establishing site chronology. There are a variety of different approaches to identification, emphasizing origin, decoration, or production method. This seminar will use a technology-based approach, teaching how to identify how an object was made, given the strong relationships between manufacture, and geographic and temporal variation. The seminar will cover the 4 main ceramic materials (coarse earthenware, refined earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain), outline the characteristics of the primary manufacturing techniques, and discuss broad trends in decorative motifs/techniques. This approach will provide participants with a toolkit for identifying wares they may encounter, based on key diagnostic features.

  1. Distinguish four main ceramic materials (coarse earthenware, refined earthenware, stoneware, porcelain)
  2. Recognize technological change in pottery production through time
  3. Recognize decorative change in pottery production through time

An Introduction to Effective Mentoring in Archaeology

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An Introduction to Effective Mentoring in Archaeology

When: September 30, 2021 1:00-2:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; $69 for non-members

Group Registration: Free to SAA members; $89 for non-members


Arianne Boileau is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology and the Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. She has 10 years of experience teaching and mentoring undergraduate and graduate students in the field, lab, and museum settings. She has built formal and informal mentorships through one-on-one mentoring, peer mentoring, and group mentoring. Her mentorship centers on developing plans in line with her mentees’ goals, providing psychosocial assistance when needed, and creating reciprocal, inclusive mentoring relationships. Her mentoring work at the University of Florida has earned her a 2020 Graduate Student Mentoring Award.

Mentoring is one of the keys to success in the academic and professional world. It contributes to the acquisition of skills and knowledge, while providing needed socialization and personal support to ensure success in work and learning environments. Despite the science-backed advantages of effective mentorship, mentoring is a skill that is rarely taught. The goal of this seminar is to provide archaeologists with an introduction to the key principles of good mentoring and to define the roles and responsibilities of mentors and mentees. We will learn why mentoring cannot be equated to teaching, coaching, or advising. Participants will be provided with tools to create an inclusive mentoring environment and foster effective mentor-mentee relationships. We will also explore how mentees can identify potential mentors and enter beneficial, reciprocal mentoring relationships. The seminar is intended for both academic and non-academic archaeologists at any career stage who have little to no mentoring experience or who want to sharpen their mentoring skills.
  1. Describe what mentoring is and how it differs from teaching and advising.
  2. Identify the principles of effective mentoring relationships and become familiar with the roles and responsibilities of mentors and mentees.
  3. Create environments and practices that enhance the mentor-mentee relationship.
  4. Introduce principles of a culturally responsive mentoring.

Ethnography for Archaeologists

Registration Closed!

Ethnography for Archaeologists

When: September 23, 2021 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Matthew Emerson is a career archaeologist who has worked on prehistory and historical archaeological field investigations through CRM, museums and academia. He has been teaching Anthropology and Archaeology at universities and colleges for several years. His ethnographic experience includes: observing and creating software for assembly line workers at the Ford Motor Company (St. Paul, MN), working with Native Americans and collections at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology (U.C. Berkeley), volunteering and interpreting for the public at Point Reyes National Seashore (NPS, Kule Loklo-Miwok village and Morgan Horse farm). Using historical records, ethnographic accounts and art historical research, Dr. Emerson has written extensively about African inspirations and survivals in locally made tobacco pipes recovered from 17th century settlements in the Chesapeake region. He has also directed ethnographic field research among the peoples of Northern Edo state, Nigeria and he is one of the editors of Edo North, Field Studies of the Languages and Lands of the Northern Edo (2011). Currently, he is working on an article on cassava farming and village gari production based on field research among the Okpameri of Akoko-Edo local government area, Nigeria.

This online seminar begins with a review of the descriptive and interpretative nature of ethnography as it has been traditionally and more recently practiced in Anthropology and Archaeology. Concepts and methods are summarized with insights into their value for investigations of pre-text, historical and contemporary societies. The overall premise is that learning about other peoples adds to a knowledge about the human condition and culture which may make us better people. This lecture is for first-in-field and experienced practioners and includes time for sharing ethnographic experiences.

  1. Understand the terms associated with the theory and practice of ethnography in modern, historical and prehistory contexts.
  2. Review the methods of ethnography including: participant-observation, thick description, interviewing and recording, concepts of manifest and latent functionality, etic-emic, perspectives, impression management and positionality, and the impact and ethical, responsibilities of researcher(s) to sponsors and studied communities.
  3. Understand how and when modern or historical ethnographic studies may inform inquiries on human relationships with and connections to landscapes, natural and built environments, subsistence strategies and material culture.
  4. Become familiar with the challenges and benefits of connecting ethnographic inquiry with living communities engaged in heritage research.
  5. Understand the concept of research as surveillance and the ethnographic refusal.

LiDAR Recordation Techniques for Cultural Resources: Selecting an Application for Your Project

Registration Closed!

LiDAR Recordation Techniques for Cultural Resources: Selecting an Application for Your Project

When: May 25, 2021 2:00-4:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


C. Cliff Creger and Beth P. Smith have been utilizing LiDAR capture and recordation methods since 2008 in situations spanning across the spread of the Nevada Department of Transportation’s cultural resources work. They have used and presented LiDAR recordings of petroglyphs, ruins, haunted hotels, antelope traps, excavated caves, Mastodon teeth, and lithic tools.

This presentation reviews and illustrates the wide application spectrum of LiDAR technologies for use in cultural resources projects. Depending on the feature or object to be scanned in the field, aerial, terrestrial and drone data each deliver different final products. The instructors will discuss methods for selecting a project-specific approach, the setup of the recordation event, and how to achieve the visualization outcome desired for the project. The lecture will include case studies from cultural resource projects. The instructors will discuss the steps to consider, including how to “look” at the object to be recorded in three dimensions and estimate how to perform the scan to achieve and produce the final 3D object. They will review the use of engineering-grade LiDAR, iPhone LiDAR, and photogrammetry-based LiDAR, as well as some common mistakes to avoid in collecting and processing 3D data.
  1. Develop methods for selecting a project-specific approach
  2. Explain the setup of the recordation event
  3. Outline how to achieve the visualization outcome desired for the project