Past Seminars

Professional Rock Art Recording: Simplified and Accurate

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Professional Rock Art Recording: Simplified and Accurate

When: January 12, 2021 3:00-5:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Carol Patterson has 20 years experience teaching rock art recording field schools. She learned the techniques while a PhD candidate attending a rock art field school in Australia in 1998. In the United States, she co-taught with Dr. Alan Watchman several 3- 5 day field schools, offering college credit to students and free tuition to Native students. These classes included participation by members of the Northern Ute, the Wanapum tribe in eastern Washington, and the Southern Ute tribe in Colorado. Over the decades, Dr. Patterson has continued to conduct rock art documenting sessions in the field and annually teaches classes in university classroom settings at Colorado University at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and Mesa State University. She also conducts rock art recording for Colorado Archaeological Society chapters, Program for Avocational Archaeological Certification classes, rock art research groups, and site steward volunteers.
Learn a simple and efficient way to record rock art without expensive equipment, suffering in extreme temperatures, or fighting difficult lighting conditions. This method uses digital systematic photography on site, and then processing and drawing the digital images. The instructor will use examples from many different field schools, with challenging geographic locations to guide you through the process, demonstrating how to draw exactly what is there. This can be easy, fast, and fun, with low-tech materials that yield high-tech illustrations. The instructor will also emphasize the need for Native partnerships in understanding what information is important to collect from their perspective and what future researchers need to create multi-cultural, user-friendly rock art databases.
1. Learn how to produce the most accurate reproduction of prehistoric rock engravings and paintings possible with systematic documentation.
2. Explain how to record rock art within the context of the surrounding resources, like water/springs, edible plants, game trails, eco-zones, and archaeological features.
3. Identify threats to the images including natural weathering, spalling areas, and human threats.
4. See how to photograph the viewscapes to place the panel within the context of the rock formation, and surrounding land features.

Improving Your Archaeological Skills: How to Write Better Technical Reports

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Improving Your Archaeological Skills: How to Write Better Technical Reports

When: December 15, 2020 1:00-2:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; $69 for non-members

Group Registration: Free to SAA members; $89 for non-members


Mary Beth Trubitt has worked in Cultural Resource Management and academia, and for the last twenty years has served as a research station archaeologist for the Arkansas Archeological Survey. She has written archaeological reports and has read many more of them, and brings a perspective on what makes reports interesting to write and useful to read. In 2020, Trubitt concludes a term as editor for Southeastern Archaeology and begins a term as editor for Caddo Archeology Journal.

It may seem overwhelming to sort through the details of archaeological fieldwork and artifact analyses and sit down to write the technical report. Just as you need a plan for investigations, you need a plan for summarizing the results. This seminar will provide archaeologists with strategies and resources to organize and write a technical report that will provide readers with the necessary information.
  1. Identify the audiences for your technical report and the information they expect
  2. Discover helpful resources for organizing and supporting your report
  3. Learn some do’s and don’ts for better writing technical reports

Introduction to Bayesian Chronological Modeling

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Introduction to Bayesian Chronological Modeling

When: December 03, 2020 1:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Carla Hadden is an Assistant Research Scientist in the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory at the University of Georgia Center for Applied Isotope Studies. Dr. Hadden specializes in radiocarbon dating, environmental archaeology, and zooarchaeology, and is an Associate Editor for Radiocarbon, the main international journal of record for research articles relevant to radiocarbon techniques. She regularly publishes on radiocarbon method development and archaeological applications in high-impact journals such as Science Advances, American Antiquity, and Radiocarbon, and is regularly called upon to peer review manuscript submissions on radiocarbon dating and Bayesian chronological modeling in archaeology.

Bayesian chronological modeling revolutionized chronology building in archaeology. It provided a robust mathematical framework for incorporating all the dating information available, including radiocarbon dates, stratigraphy, artifact typologies, and the written historical record. The purpose of this seminar is to provide archaeologists with an introduction to the key concepts, assumptions, and terminology used in Bayesian chronological modeling; an overview of the basic structures and applications of age models; and an introduction to the “iterative approach” to sample selection and chronological modeling. We will introduce the audience to the several software options available for age modeling (OxCal, BCal, and various packages implemented in R) and compare their pros and cons. We will not provide a step-by-step “how to” for constructing models in any one program, but participants will receive a workbook and “quick start” guide for modeling in OxCal. This course will enable participants to understand and evaluate age models that they encounter in archaeological literature; will provide a necessary foundation for those interested in exploring how Bayesian models could contribute to their own projects; and will provide resources for those who wish to learn more about constructing chronological models. The intended audience includes those who have no previous experience in Bayesian chronological modeling.

  1. Understand the basic terminology related to Bayesian chronological modeling, e.g., event; phase; sequence; boundary; MCMC; prior probability; posterior probability; likelihood; parameter; convergence; agreement
  2. Evaluate and interpret model outputs
  3. Understand and follow the conventions for reporting modeled dates in technical reports and scientific journals

Defining Mitigation in Cultural Resource Management

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Defining Mitigation in Cultural Resource Management

When: November 10, 2020 2:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 1 hour

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: Free to SAA members; $69 for non-members

Group Registration: Free to SAA members; $89 for non-members


Kurt Dongoske is the President and Principal Investigator for Zuni Cultural Resource Enterprise. He is also the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Zuni Tribe. Mr. Dongoske has over 40 years of experience as a professional archaeologist working within cultural resource management. Mr. Dongoske has spent the last 29 years working collaboratively with Native Americans in implementing archaeological and ethnographic research. He has designed numerous ethnographic projects that incorporate the traditional environmental perspectives of both the Hopi and Zuni people. Mr. Dongoske is a Registered Professional Archaeologist and holds a Master of Arts degree from the University of Arizona. Mr. Dongoske has published numerous articles on Native Americans, cultural resource management, and compliance.

Kurt Anschuetz is an anthropologist and archaeologist based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. His research foci are the archaeology of late Prehispanic and early Historic period Pueblo agricultural water management and Native, Hispanic, and Anglo cultural landscapes. Dr. Anschuetz currently is assisting the Pueblo of Acoma in preparing a Traditional Cultural Properties study in Chaco Canyon and the greater the San Juan Basin. He has worked with Acoma in contributing to the Mount Taylor Cultural Property Nomination to the New Mexico State Register of Cultural Properties, and is a member of the Pueblo’s team of consultants in the adjudication of the waters of Rio San Jose. He has completed comprehensive cultural landscape studies of Native, Hispanic, and Anglo communities’ relationships with the Valles Caldera National Preserve. Dr. Anschuetz also serves as an Expert Witness for the U.S. Department of Justice in water rights adjudications on behalf of the Rio Grande Pueblos of Cochiti, Isleta, Kewa, Ohkay Owingeh, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, and Taos.

By definition, "mitigation" is reducing the severity, force or intensity, seriousness, painfulness or grief of an event, development, procedure, or situation. As part of the CRM mitigation processes, direct, indirect, and cumulative effects on cultural resources that fulfill one or more of the National Register of Historic Places’ (NRHP’s) criteria must all be identified in order to address any competent approach to and for mitigation. Two key questions must then also arise within any mitigation process: (1) By whom is mitigation developed and implemented? and (2) Whose interests, concerns, benefits, and well-being are addressed? Historically in the United States, mitigation in CRM has focused on the status and character of a material property itself. Recognition of traditional cultural properties (TCPs) has provided productive directives to identify and consider properties vital to different cultural groups' living identities, histories, values, belief systems, and lifeways. These directives have concomitantly presented a challenge to consider what culturally sensitive and respectful mitigation may—or may not—be. The instructors present examples from their experiences working with the Acoma and Zuni people to illustrate how approaches to mitigation can be sensitive and respectful, as well as lessen the pain, grief, and even wrath, for harms and losses that the people are asked to endure.

  1. Guidance in designing and conducting compliance with the NHPA that more meaningfully and equitably involves Native Americans
  2. Greater appreciation and understanding of Native American heritage concerns, including their personal and collective relationships to the landscape
  3. Recognition of patterns of systematic cultural bias embedded in the language of the NHPA and the ways in which that affects how archaeologists characteristically implement CRM legislative mandates and regulatory protocols

An Introduction to Geoarchaeology: How Understanding Basic Soils, Sediments, and Landforms can make you a Better Archaeologist

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An Introduction to Geoarchaeology: How Understanding Basic Soils, Sediments, and Landforms can make you a Better Archaeologist

When: November 05, 2020 1:00-3:00 PM

Duration: 2 hours

Certification: RPA-certified


Pricing

Individual Registration: $99 for SAA members; $149 for non-members

Group Registration: $139 for SAA members; $189 for non-members


Teresa Wriston, Ph.D., RPA is an Assistant Research Professor and Geoarchaeologist at the Desert Research Institute. Over the past 17 years, her geoarchaeological work has focused on human adaptation to changing environments as reflected by site location, preservation, and stratigraphic contexts in the western U.S. and southern Africa.

Archaeologists know the importance of cultural context in understanding the past but often fail to recognize the importance of the natural contexts of sites, features, and artifacts in their interpretations. Looking through a geoarchaeological lens can help every archaeologist begin to understand the natural contexts of their finds. This course is designed to introduce basic geoarchaeological methods to archaeologists interested in improving their research designs, optimizing their fieldwork strategies, enhancing their stratigraphic descriptions in ways that aid component definition and sampling procedures, and using natural contexts to complement their interpretations.

  1. Describe what geoarchaeology is and why is it important to archaeologists
  2. Explain the difference between soil and sediment
  3. Illustrate why the position of an archaeological site on the landscape matters
  4. Explain how natural processes effect the archaeological record