Award Details

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Fred Plog Memorial Fellowship

Nomination/Submission Deadline: 04 Nov 2019

Award Description

An award of $1,000 is presented in memory of the late Fred Plog to support the research of a graduate student with ABD status who is writing a dissertation on the North American Southwest or northern Mexico or on a topic, such as culture change or regional interactions, on which Fred Plog did research. In the case of a tie, the award is split equally between the fellows. 

Who Is Eligible to Submit Nominations or Apply for the Award

All student members of SAA in good standing who are ABD by the time the award is made at the Annual Meeting of the SAA are eligible to apply for the award. 

Nomination/Submission Materials Required

The application consists of 1) a research proposal no more than three single-space pages long (not including bibliography and tables/figures) that describes the research and its potential contributions to American archaeology, 2) a curriculum vitae, and 3) two letters of support, including one from the dissertation chair that indicates the expected date of completion of the dissertation. 

Other Special Requirements

All nominees must be ABD by the time the award is made at the Annual Meeting of the SAA. 

Nature of Award (e.g. monetary, medal, symposium)

The award winner receives $1000. In the case of more than one fellow being selected, the award amount is split equally. In addition, the awardee is recognized by the SAA through a plaque presented during the business meeting held at the Annual Meeting, a citation in The SAA Archaeological Record, and acknowledgment on the awards page of the SAA Website. 

Current Committee Charge

The committee solicits proposals and selects recipients for the Fred Plog Memorial Fellowship. The fellowship is presented in support of research to a graduate student with ABD status who is writing a dissertation on the American Southwest or northern Mexico or on a topic, such as culture change or regional interactions, on which Fred Plog did research. 

Committee Composition

Committee composition is one chair and at least four members. Individuals ending their terms cycle off the committee at the close of the Business Meeting held during the annual SAA Meeting, and new appointees begin their terms at this time. 

Term Length

Term length is three years. Individuals ending their terms cycle off the committee at the close of the Business Meeting held during the annual SAA Meeting, and new appointees begin their terms at this time.

Award Cycle

N/A

Committee Chair and End of Term

Katherine A. Dungan [2021]

Committee Chair Contact Information

Committee Members and Ends of Terms

Matthew C. Pailes [2020], Michael Mathiowetz [2021], Kari Schleher [2022], Jun Sunseri [2022]

Selection or Evaluation Criteria

Committee members evaluate applications according to the merit and quality of the applicant's research plan; the relevance of the research project to work in the North American Southwest or northern Mexico or on a topic, such as culture change or regional interactions, on which Fred Plog did research; the letters of support; and the academic record based on the curriculum vitae. How the funds would be used to complete the dissertation will be an aspect of the evaluation. 

Committee Deliberation Process (e.g. dates, venue)

Electronic copies of applications are circulated to committee members during the week after the submission deadline. Committee members rank applications on scale of 1-3 (3 = highest) and submit rankings to the chair by the third week of November. No later than the first week of December, the committee chair distributes the tabulated rankings to the committee and coordinates a conference call or email discussion to select a fellow. 

2019  Megan Anne Conger
 
Megan Anne Conger’s work investigates the nature and tempo of culture change of Indigenous and European worlds in Southern Ontario, Canada (ca. AD 1550-1650). Her work asks: 1) Did all Indigenous nations in Ontario begin to engage with Europeans at the same time, in the same way, and how did this relationship change over time? She will answer these questions by applying archaeological science techniques to the Wendat, Tionontate, and Attiwandaron archaeological sites in Southern Ontario occupied ca. AD 1550-1650. Here she will create chronologically grounded community level databases to better understand Indigenous-European trade and exchange in Southern Ontario and Southern Québec. Her work is a reassessment of 16th & 17th C normative models of culture change that have dominated Iroquoian archaeology for the last forty years.

2018 R. J. Sinensky

2017 Katelyn Bishop

2016 Jacob Lulewicz

2015 Saul L. Hedquist

2014 Christopher W. Merriman and Kathryn J. Putsavage

2013 Katherine A. Dungan

2012 Joshua Watts

2011 William Reitze

2010 Matthew Peeples

2009 Sam Duwe

2008 Deanna Grimstead

2007 Michael Mathiowetz and Todd Pitezel

2006 None

2005 Greg Schachner

2001 Deborah Huntley

1999 Sarah Herr