Cultural Resources Reporting for Public Consumption

 
The following examples demonstrate the power of the Internet for sharing archaeological information with the public.

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 Fort Des Moines Archaeology Site Investigations

This web page, developed by the Iowa Office of the State Archaeologist, describes for the public the current (2011) excavations at the Fort Des Moines site, which was a U. S. military post from 1843-1846. This fort was the core from which modern Des Moines grew. The Fort Des Moines site will be impacted by a new road and bridge under construction in the City of Des Moines.

The 78th Street Archeological Site

This video was produced by Prairie Archaeology & Research of Springfield, Illinois--the same firm that carried out the archaeological investigation at the Katie Harper Wright Elementary School in East St. Louis, Illinois. The short, narrated video shows the discovery and investigation of a 1,000-year-old Native American village and graphically demonstrates why archaeological investigations are performed and what we can learn from these investigations into America’s past.  The video explains the importance of archeology in easy to understand language that is accessible to school children and adults alike. 3-D interpretive renderings help visualize Native American life up to 1,000 years ago.

 

Archaeological Exploration and Historic Preservation in Delaware

This web site developed by the Delaware Department of Transportation (Del DOT) shares information with both the public and professionals interested in Delaware history and archaeology, and includes a Kids Archaeology Page. The Archaeology Search Page 

can be searched by type of site or chronological category and retrieves all of the resources-those prepared by and for profesionals, as well as those for the public -- associated with the search. Users can sign up for e-mail alerts for What's New in Archaeology/Historic Preservation via the MyDelDOT Subscription Service.

Excavation and Archaeological Investigation at Bartow County's (GA) Leake Site

Archaeological studies were conducted at the important American Indian Leake Site before the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) widened Highways 61 and 113. Between 2004 and 2006, archaeologists from Southern Research, Historic Preservation Consultants, Inc. of Columbus, Georgia, excavated portions of the site that were to be impacted by the highway widening. During the fieldwork, GDOT and Southern Research (a GDOT contractor) informed the public of their findings through this web site, which includes detailed informaion about the site and excavations, artifact photographs, educational materials for teachers and students, and links to related websites.

 

Putting the "There" There: Historical Archaeologies of West Oakland

This web presentation of the Cypress Archaeology Project is an outstanding example of reaching out to the public with CRM research. Both an extensive interpretive narrative and individual technical reports are available as html and pdf files. Undertaken by the Anthropological Studies Center at Sonoma State University, this project is one of the largest CRM projects conducted to date as well as one of the most ‘publicly interpreted’.

Archaeology of a San Francisco Neighborhood

This is the California Department of Transportation’s first large scale web site for a historical archaeology mitigation project. It is the result of two archaeological projects undertaken by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and Anthropological Studies Center (ASC) at Sonoma State University in the South of Market area of San Francisco. Caltrans funded the development of this Web site.

Texas Beyond History

This web site was developed by the Texas Archeological Research Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin, in partnership with 16 other organizations. Begun in 2001, its purpose is to interpret and share the results of archeological and historical research on the cultural heritage of Texas with the citizens of Texas and the world. In this virtual museum you will find information on and images of many different aspects of the cultural legacy of Texas, a legacy spanning at least 13,500 years.

 

Updated 04/21/2011