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Editor's Corner

You've noticed (I hope) that the September issue of the SAA Bulletin arrived on your desk somewhat later than usual. Although it would be easy to pass the buck and blame the Postal Service, the truth is more prosaic. When the Bulletin arrives, it will be accompanied by the 1998 Administrative and Member Directory. Having the two sent together saved SAA some mailing costs. We do apologize, though, for the delay, and we assure you that future issues will arrive on schedule.

Educational issues dominate this Bulletin. An informed and interested public is one of our field's greatest assests, and we should do everything possible within our own areas of expertise to foster a more comprehensive understanding of archaeology among the various publics we serve. We're running the first installment of a report on the Wakulla Springs conference, in part sponsored by SAA, and three others will appear through the March 1999 issue. This conference took a hard look at graduate, undergraduate, and post-graduate training, and its participants have made a number of thought-provoking recommendations for teaching our students. Some may find the recommendations controversial, but regardless of your opinion, give them serious thought, since they create a vision for the future of archaeological education.


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