Login Join | Annual Meeting | Jobs | SAANews | Marketplace | Contact   Search

 

 Latin American Antiquity Minimize





 Volume 20 Number 1 March 2009

PART 1: THEMED SECTION ON TECHNOLOGY APPROACHES

ARTICLES

Juvenile Age Estimation Using Diaphyseal Long Bone Lengths among Ancient Maya Populations
Marie Elaine Danforth, Gabriel D. Wrobel, Carl W. Armstrong, and David Swanson

Isotopic Evidence for Diet at Chau Hiix, Belize: Testing Regional Models of Hierarchy and Heterarchy
Jessica Z. Metcalfe, Christine D. White, Fred J. Longstaffe, Gabriel Wrobel, Della Collins Cook, and K. Anne Pyburn

Maya Marine Subsistence: Isotopic Evidence from Marco Gonzalez and San Pedro, Belize
Jocelyn S. Williams, Christine D. White, and Fred J. Longstaffe

Strontium Isotope Evidence for Prehistoric Migration at Chokepukio, Valley of Cuzco, Peru
Valerie A. Andrushko, Michele R. Buzon, Antonio Simonetti, and Robert A. Creaser

Difficulties in Rejecting a Local Ancestry with Mtdna Haplogroup Data in the South Central Andes
Cecil M. Lewis, Jr.

The Economic Geography of Chert Lithic Production in the Southern Maya Lowlands: A Comparative Examination of Early Stage Reduction Debris
C. Scott Speal

Assessing the Scale of Prehistoric Human Impact in the Neotropics Using Stable Carbon Isotope Analyses of Lake Sediments: A Test Case from Costa Rica
Chad S. Lane, Sally P. Horn, Zachary P. Taylor, and Claudia I. Mora

PART 2: THEMED SECTION ON MESOAMERICA

Lithic Industry in a Maya Center: An Axe Workshop at El Pilar, Belize
John C.Whittaker, Kathryn A. Kamp, Anabel Ford, Rafael Guerra, Peter Brands, Jose Guerra, Kim Mclean, Alex Woods, Melissa Badillo, Jennifer Thornton, and Zerifeh Eiley

Evaluating the Distributional Approach to Inferring Marketplace Exchange: A Test Case from the Mexican Gulf Lowlands
Christopher P. Garraty

The Ancient Maya Drought Cult: Late Classic Cave Use in Belize
Holley Moyes, Jaime J. Awe, George A. Brook, and James W. Webster

An Alternative Order: The Dualistic Economies of the Ancient Maya
Vernon L. Scarborough and Fred Valdez, Jr.

A Maya Palace at Holmul, Peten, Guatemala and the Teotihuacan “Entrada”: Evidence from Murals 7 and 9
Francisco Estrada-Belli, Alexandre Tokovinine, Jennifer M. Foley, Heather Hurst, Gene A. Ware, David Stuart, and Nikolai Grube

Book Review Essay

The Olmecs: America’s First Civilization by Richard A. Diehl; and Olmec Archaeology and Early Mesoamerica by Christopher A. Pool
David Cheetham

 

37
Maya Marine Subsistence: Isotopic Evidence from Marco Gonzalez and San Pedro, Belize
Jocelyn S. Williams, Christine D. White, and Fred J. Longstaffe
This article presents stable nitrogen and carbon isotopic analyses of diet at the Maya sites of Marco Gonzalez and San Pedro, Belize. This study, which provides important insight into social organization, trade, and subsistence economy for the Postclassic and historic periods (ca. A.D. 900–1650), also expands our understanding of the distribution of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes within coral reef food webs off coastal Belize. Marco Gonzalez and San Pedro represent the first documented ancient Maya populations whose diet consisted mostly of marine resources with a minimal reliance upon maize. Although these sites do not appear highly stratified, and there are no dietary differences between sexes or status, the inhabitants of Marco Gonzalez incorporated more mainland-terrestrial animals and maize into their diet than the people of San Pedro. This finding supports the postulated roles of these two settlements, where Marco Gonzalez had trade ties to the mainland site of Lamanai and San Pedro was a small fishing village.

Este artículo presenta análisis isotópicos de nitrógeno y carbono estables de la dieta en los emplazamientos mayas de Marco González y San Pedro, en Belice. Este estudio, que provee una importante comprensión de la organización social, comercio y economía de subsistencia en los períodos Posclásico e Histórico (alrededor de los años d.C. 900–1650), también expande nuestro entendimiento de la distribución de los isótopos estables de carbono y nitrógeno dentro de las cadenas alimenticias marinas y de arrecifes en la costa de Belice. Marco González y San Pedro representan las primeras poblaciones mayas antiguas documentadas cuya dieta consistía en su mayoría de recursos marinos, con una mínima dependencia del maíz. Aunque estas sitios no parecen ser altamente estratificadas, y no muestran diferencias dietéticas entre sexos o posición social, los habitantes de Marco González incorporaron más animales terrestres y/o maíz en sus dietas que la gente de San Pedro. Este hallazgo apoya los roles postulados para estos dos asentamientos, en que Marco González tenía vínculos con el sitio de tierra adentro de Lamanai y San Pedro era una pequeña villa de pescadores.


57
Strontium Isotope Evidence for Prehistoric Migration at Chokepukio, Valley of Cuzco, Peru
Valerie A. Andrushko, Michele R. Buzon, Antonio Simonetti, and Robert A. Creaser
This article presents evidence of prehistoric migrations in the Cuzco Valley, based on an analysis of strontium isotopes in human remains. Samples of dental enamel obtained from individuals buried in the site of Chokepukio in the Cuzco Valley have been analyzed to determine if there were immigrants living among the local population. Our data indicate the presence of various migrants buried in Chokepukio in the Inca or Late Horizon (1400–1532 A.D.), but the data do not confirm the presence of migrants prior to the Inca period. The variation in strontium levels suggests that individuals migrated to the Inca capital from diverse locations. A demographic analysis of the migration suggests that the Inca state directed the migration to fulfill imperial obligations.

Este artículo presenta evidencia de las migraciones prehistóricas en el valle de Cuzco basado en un análisis de los isótopos de estroncio en los restos humanos. Muestras del esmalte dental de individuos enterrados en el sitio de Chokepukio en el valle de Cuzco han sido analizadas para determinar si habían imigrantes viviendo entre la población local. Nuestros datos indican la presencia de varios individuos migratorios enterrados en Chokepukio en la muestra del Horizonte Tardío/período Inca (1400–1532 d.C.), pero los datos no confirman la presencia de imigrantes antes del período Inca. La variación en niveles de estroncio sugiere que individuos migraron a la capital incaica de lugares diversos. Un análisis de la demografía de la migración sugiere que el estado inca dirigió la migración para cumplir con obligaciones al imperio incaico.


76
Difficulties in Rejecting a Local Ancestry with Mtdna Haplogroup Data in the South Central Andes
Cecil M. Lewis, Jr.
This study assesses whether local genetic drift within populations can be rejected as a sufficient explanation for mitochondrial DNA haplogroup frequency changes between contemporary and prehistoric population samples in the South-Central Andes. Differences in the frequencies of haplogroups between populations are a popular line of evidence for assessing population history. The null hypothesis of haplogroup frequency change is a stochastic force inherent to finite populations called genetic drift. Genetic drift is particularly influential in small populations. Innumerable historical events can result in low population sizes, and the simplest scenarios for these events are those occurring locally. In this study, simulations are used to provide a baseline for the amount of haplogroup-frequency difference expected from local genetic drift over time. The results from the simulations are compared to observed data from 23 population samples, including six prehistoric population samples. The study concludes that local genetic drift cannot be rejected when comparing a prehistoric population to a contemporary population. For the South-Central Andes, these results have dire consequences when attempting to infer genetic exchange. This study demonstrates that more informative genetic data are required for such inferences.

El presente estudio evalúa si la Deriva genética que ocurre entre poblaciones locales puede ser rechazada cuando se explican los cambios en las frecuencias de los haplogrupos observadas entre poblaciones contemporáneas y prehistóricas en la zona Sur Central de los Andes. La diferencia en las frecuencias de los haplogrupos mitocondriales entre poblaciones, ha sido una evidencia popular en la evaluación de la historia de poblaciones. La hipótesis nula de que las frecuencias de haplogrupos es un proceso estocástico inherente a poblaciones finitas es llamada Deriva génica. La Deriva génica es especialmente influyente en poblaciones pequeñas. Innumerables eventos históricos pueden resultar en periodos de tiempo en los cuales el tamaño de población es bajo; el escenario más simple envuelve eventos de ocurrencia local. En este estudio, se emplean simulaciones para generar una línea base para la magnitud de la diferencia en la frecuencia esperada para los haplogrupos a partir de la deriva génica local a través del tiempo. Los resultados de las simulaciones son comparados con los datos observados a partir de 23 muestras de poblaciones, incluyendo seis muestras de poblaciones prehistóricas. El estudio concluye que la deriva génica local no puede ser rechazada cuando se compara una población prehistórica con una población contemporánea. Para la zona Sur Central de los Andes, estos resultados tienen consecuencias directas en el intento de inferir intercambio genético. Este estudio demuestra que se requieren más datos genéticos para ese tipo de inferencias.



91
The Economic Geography of Chert Lithic Production in the Southern Maya Lowlands: A Comparative Examination of Early Stage Reduction Debris
C. Scott Speal
It has been known for several decades that certain regions of the Maya Lowlands were characterized by specialized production of chert tools in ancient times. The extent, intensity, organization, and net social effects of centralized lithic production in the Maya area as a whole, however, are not well understood. In order to address issues of broader relevance to social and economic processes, lithicists working in the Maya region need to develop analytical approaches suited to the study of complex economies. The research presented here attempts to establish simple baseline measures for use in comparing the production of siliceous stone tools, both formal and expedient, at different scales across the Maya area. Scholarship in this region has been chronically plagued by prolonged, unresolved debates—mostly a factor of the multitude of single-site-focused projects employing different methodologies and research emphases. The present study therefore proposes a new direction in Maya lithic studies with the goal of enhancing comparability of data on ancient economic structure through the use of standardized statistics that facilitate spatial analysis. Using the proportion of early-stage core reduction debris to the total of all debitage from a given context, for instance, enables the analyst to roughly assess the amount of tool manufacture taking place locally. By extension, inferences can be made about the degree of economic integration and interdependence characterizing any given geographic scale, including the architectural group, site, region, and so on. Preliminary analysis of patterns in early-stage reduction illustrates differential spatial distributions of chert tool production and consumption at several scales from across the southern Lowlands, allowing for the refinement of current models of ancient Maya lithic economy.

Se ha sabido por varias décadas que en tiempos antiguos ciertas regiones de las tierra bajas Mayas estuvieron caracterizadas por la producción especializada de herramientas de sílex. Los alcances, la intensidad, la organización, y los efectos sociales de la producción centralizada en el área Maya como una totalidad, sin embargo, no son bien comprendidos. Para poder introducir en temas de mayor importancia a los estudiantes de antiguas organizaciones socioeconómicas, los investigadores de tecnología lítica que trabajan en la región Maya necesitan desarollar acercamientos analíticos adecuados al estudio de economías complejas. Este estudio intenta establecer algunas mediciones sencillas que pueden ser usadas para comparar la producción de implementos de lítica lasqueada, ya sea de manera formal o rápida, a diferentes escalas geograficas. De esta manera, se propone tomar una nueva dirección con el propósito de aumentar la comparación de los datos sobre las antiguas estructuras económicas mediante el uso de estadísticas estandardizadas que faciliten el análisis espacial. El análisis entre la proporción de residuos que resultan de las primeras etapas reducción del núcleo y la totalidad del debitage en un determinado contexto, permite al especialista en lítica determinar de manera burda la cantidad de herramientas que fueron manufacturadas localmente. Con base en ello, se pueden hacer inferencias sobre el grado de integración económica y de interdependencia que caracterice a cualquier escala geográfica, incluyendo el grupo arquitectónico, el sitio, la región, etc. El análisis de los patrones de las primeeras etapas de reducción ilustra las diferencias espaciales de producción y consumo de herramientas de sílex a diferentes escalas por todas las tierras bajas. Estas resultas preliminares sugieran unos refinamientos de los actuales modelos sobre la antigua economía lítica Maya.


120
Assessing the Scale of Prehistoric Human Impact in the Neotropics Using Stable Carbon Isotope Analyses of Lake Sediments: A Test Case from Costa Rica
Chad S. Lane, Sally P. Horn, Zachary P. Taylor, and Claudia I. Mora
Analyses of pollen and other terrestrial microfossils in sediment profiles from neotropical lakes can complement and extend archaeological studies by documenting the timing of prehistoric human disturbances within watersheds. However, assessing the scale of prehistoric human impact from sedimentary microfossil assemblages alone is often difficult. We explore here the utility of combining stable carbon isotope (δ13C) analyses of lake sediments and isotopic mixing models to improve our ability to gauge the extent of prehistoric human disturbance recorded in sediment profiles. Our test case involves the analysis of a sediment core from Laguna Bonillita on the central Caribbean slope of Costa Rica that spans approximately the last 2,700 calendar years. Variations in the δ13C values of the Laguna Bonillita sediments suggest that human population growth and environmental impacts in the watershed were at their maximum ~cal yr 300 B.C. This finding is in keeping with archaeological evidence of rapid regional population growth at this time but differs from initial interpretations of the sediment record that were based on pollen and charcoal analyses alone. We believe that the use of stable carbon isotope data from sediment profiles can improve estimates of the scale of prehistoric human impact and in doing so improve the contributions of paleoecological research to archaeology.

Los análises del polen y de los otros microfósiles terrestres en perfíles de sedimentos de lagos neotropicales pueden complementar y ampliar los estudios arqueológicos por documentar la cronología de perturbaciones humanas prehistóricos dentro de las cuencas de los lagos. Sin embargo, evaluando la escala del impacto humano prehistórico sólo de los conjuntos sedimentarios de microfósiles es a menudo difícil. Exploramos aquí la utilidad de combinar el análisis de los isótopos estables del carbono (δ13C) de los sedimentos lacustres con modelos de mezclar isotópicos (isotope mixing models) para mejorar nuestra capacidad de estimar el grado de pertubación prehistórica humana registrada en perfiles de sedimento. Nuestro caso de prueba implica el análisis de un núcleo de sedimento de Laguna Bonillita en la vertiente Caribe central de Costa Rica que atreviesa aproximadamente los últimos 2,700 años calibrados. Las variaciones en los valores δ13C de los sedimentos de Laguna Bonillita sugieren que el crecimiento demográfico humano y los impactos ambientales en la cuenca estuvieran en su máximo aproximadamente 300 años calibrados a.C. Este hallazgo concuerda con la evidencia arqueológica del crecimiento demográfico regional rápido en este tiempo, pero se diferencia de interpretaciones iniciales del registro de sedimento que estaban basadas únicamentes en los análisis de polen y carbón. Creemos que el uso de datos de isótopos estables de carbóno en perfíles de sedimento puede mejorar estimaciones de la escala del impacto humano prehistórico, y en hacer así mejore las contribuciones de la investigación paleoecológica a la arqueología.


134
Lithic Industry in a Maya Center: An Axe Workshop at El Pilar, Belize
John C.Whittaker, Kathryn A. Kamp, Anabel Ford, Rafael Guerra, Peter Brands, Jose Guerra, Kim Mclean, Alex Woods, Melissa Badillo, Jennifer Thornton, and Zerifeh Eiley
Cahal Tok (Place of Flint) is a limestone rise with some structural evidence, associated with the previously designated LDF Chert Site, close to the ceremonial center of El Pilar. Excavations uncovered evidence that during the Late Classic period, specialized flintknappers produced bifaces, primarily chert axes, at the Cahol Tok locus, first on a cleared limestone shelf, then on a prepared cobble platform. Small flakes remained in situ whereas much of the larger debris was deposited to the east off the edge of the platform and into the LDF debitage dump. The identification of a specialized manufacturing locale near the ceremonial precinct of a major center is unusual in Maya archaeology. Central control of an important industry may be implied, although knapping could equally well be organized more independently. We expect that small industrial areas are actually present at most large sites, but may often be difficult to recognize.

Cahal Tok (Lugar de Pedernal) es una pequeña elevación de piedra caliza con alguna evidencia estructural asociada al previamente designado “LDF lugar de pedernal” cercano al centro ceremonial de El Pilar. Las excavaciones han encontrado evidencia de un taller de especialistas en trabajo de pedernal durante el Clásico Tardío. En este taller se producían hachas de pedernal, inicialmente sobre una losa de piedra caliza, y posteriormente sobre una plataforma adoquinada. Se encontraron lascas pequeñas in situ, pero los pedazos grandes habían sido removidos al basurero fuera del límite oriente de la plataforma. La identificación de un taller de manufactura especializada cercano a un recinto ceremonial prominente es un acontecimiento raro en la arqueología Maya. Esto puede implicar el control central de una industria importante, pero también puede ser posible que el taller estuviera organizado de manera independiente. Anticipamos la presencia de pequeñas áreas industriales en la mayoría de los centros prominentes, pero estas áreas pueden ser difíciles de reconocer.

157
Evaluating the Distributional Approach to Inferring Marketplace Exchange: A Test Case from the Mexican Gulf Lowlands
Christopher P. Garraty
Nearly a decade ago Kenneth Hirth (1998, 2000) developed a “distributional approach” for archaeologically inferring the existence of marketplace exchange based on analyses of domestic artifact collections. Domestic collections, he reasoned, will be relatively homogeneous in areas where most or all households rely on marketplace exchange to acquire domestic provisions. The present study evaluates Hirth’s distributional approach using a statistical measure of diversity (heterogeneity) to quantify variability among domestic collection units over a large area. The data for this study come from the Middle Postclassic lower Blanco region of Veracruz (A.D. 1200–A.D. 1350), an unknown context of marketplace exchange. A comparison of diversity scores calculated on surface sherd collections from the lower Blanco region with scores from Late Postclassic Teotihuacan (A.D. 1350–A.D. 1520)—a known context of marketplace exchange—suggests the existence of a marketplace exchange system in the lower Blanco region, likely centered at the town of El Sauce. In addition, changes in intercollection diversity (sherds) and obsidian concentrations with increasing distance from the center suggest El Sauce’s market service area encompassed a radius of approximately six to nine kilometers.

Casi hace una década Kenneth Hirth (1998, 2000) desarrolló su “método distribucional” para deducir arqueológicamente la existencia del intercambio de mercado basada en análisis de las ensambladuras domésticas de artefactos. Las ensambladuras domésticas son relativamentes homogéneos en lugares donde la mayoría de las unidades domésticas dependen del intercambio de mercado para obtener las provisiones domésticas. Este estudio evalúa el método distribucional usando una técnica estadística de diversidad para cuantificar variabilidad entre las ensambladuras domésticas a través de un área grande. Específicamente, se trata de variabilidad entre las ensambladuras de la region del bajo Río Blanco en Veracruz, un contexto desconocido del intercambio de mercado, durante el período posclásico medio (1200–1350 d. C.). Una comparación de las estadísticas de diversidad calculadas en las mismas ensambladuras cerámicas con las ensambladuras cerámicas de Teotihuacán durante el período posclásico tarde (1350–1520 d. C.), un contexto conocido del intercambio de mercado, sugiere la existencia de intercambio de mercado en la región del bajo Río Blanco, centrada probablemente en el centro de El Sauce. Además, patrones de cambiar en las estadísticas de diversidad y en las concentraciones de obsidiana con el aumento de la distancia del centro sugieren que la área de servicio del mercado abarcara un radio de seis a nueve kilómetros.


175
The Ancient Maya Drought Cult: Late Classic Cave Use in Belize
Holley Moyes, Jaime J. Awe, George A. Brook, and James W. Webster
Caves were used as ritual venues by the ancient Maya from the Early Middle Preclassic to the Postclassic Classic period. These sites have been intensively investigated but little research has been devoted to changes in cave use over time. Work at Chechem Ha Cave in western Belize investigates transformations in ritual practice occurring between the Early and Late Classic periods using an explanatory framework that incorporates high definition archaeological research with a paleoclimate reconstruction derived from speleothems. This is one of the first projects to directly link these data to the archaeological record. We also introduce new methodology to evaluate changes in ritual practice using use-intensity proxies and artifact patterning. These data demonstrate that Late Classic transformations were coeval with climatic drying. The phenomenon was identified in this case study and the pattern is prevalent throughout the eastern lowlands suggesting that an ancient Maya drought cult was initiated at this time. We provide the first evidence that there was a failed ritual response to environmental stress, implying that a loss of faith in Maya rulership contributed to the downfall of political systems. This is an important finding for collapse theories that include ideological causations.

Las cuevas fueron utilizadas por los antiguos mayas como lugares rituales desde el Preclásico Temprano Medio hasta Postclásico. Si bien han sido intensamente investigadas, poco se ha hecho para entender los cambios temporales en el uso de las cuevas. Las investigaciones en Chechem Ha, una cueva ubicada Belice occidental, aportan al conocimiento sobre las transformaciones en la práctica ritual entre los períodos Clásicos Temprano y Final a través de la investigación arqueológica de alta definición conjuntamente con la reconstrucción paleoclimática derivada de estalagmitas; siendo este uno de los primeros proyectos que realiza este intento. También introducimos una nueva metodología para evaluar los cambios en la práctica ritual empleando proxies de uso intensivo y patrones en los artefactos. Estos datos demuestran que las transformaciones del Clásico Final covarían con el proceso de desertización climático. Esto fue identificado en este caso y el patrón es frecuente a través de las tierras bajas orientales sugiriendo que el antiguo culto maya de la sequía comenzó durante esos momentos. Proporcionamos la primera evidencia de una respuesta ritual fallida al estrés ambiental, dando lugar a una pérdida de fe en las reglas y liderazgos mayas contribuyendo así a la caída de los sistemas políticos. Este es un dato importante dentro de las teorías del colapso maya ya que tienen en cuenta las causalidades ideológicas de la población.


207
An Alternative Order: The Dualistic Economies of the Ancient Maya
Vernon L. Scarborough and Fred Valdez, Jr.
Harkening back to the debates associated with “dualistic economies” in addressing emerging nation states, we examine aspects of the ancient economy of the lowland Maya. Resource-specialized communities were knit together in a network of interdependencies that allowed high degrees of self-sustaining separation from the large monumental centers about which we know most. The social and biophysical environs of the ancient Maya permitted multiple economic spheres that influenced their political organization and affected their lack of developed hegemonic controls. Evidence is presented from the present-day ecological set aside of the Programme for Belize in northwestern Belize.

Prestando atención a los debates asociados con “economías dualistas” refiriéndose a los estados de naciones emergentes, examinamos aspectos de la economía antigua de los mayas de tierras bajas. Las comunidades especializadas en recursos estaban entretejidas en una red de interdependencias que permitía un alto grado de separación auto-sustentable de los grandes centros monumentales de los cuales sabemos más. El entorno social y biofísico de los antiguos mayas permitió multiples esferas económicas que influenciaron a su organización política y afectaron su falta de controles hegemónicos desarrollados. Se presenta evidencia actual del entorno ecológico al lado de Programme for Belize en el noroeste de Belice.


228
A Maya Palace at Holmul, Peten, Guatemala and the Teotihuacan “Entrada”: Evidence from Murals 7 and 9
Francisco Estrada-Belli, Alexandre Tokovinine, Jennifer M. Foley, Heather Hurst, Gene A. Ware, David Stuart, and Nikolai Grube

Excavations at La Sufricaya, a minor ritual group in the outskirts of the Lowland Maya city of Holmul, have documented two mural paintings inside an elite building of Early Classic date (A.D. 300-600). One of the paintings is mythological in nature (Mural 9). The second bears an inscription with references to calendrical and historical events. It commemorates a notorious arrival date at Tikal on 11 Eb 15 (January 16, A.D. 378) on its first anniversary. The architecture and artifacts associated with the murals combine Maya and Teotihuacan decorative motifs, and offer several parallels with Tikal assemblages. The iconography, epigraphy and archaeological associations of these murals are discussed in relation to the function of the palace complex. This important new evidence contributes to an understanding of which role relations with Teotihuacan may have played in regional politics in the Maya Lowlands during the Early Classic period from the point of view of a smaller site. The interpretations presented here focus on the concept of political intervention of Tikal in the affairs of secondary and tertiary sites.

El reciente hallazgo de dos pinturas murales en el sitio de La Sufricaya, en la cercanía de la ciudad Maya de Holmul, Peten ofrece la oportunidad de discutir la relación entre las ciudades Maya y sus relaciones con Teotihuacan en la época Clásico Temprana. Los murales se encuentran en un complejo de edificios palaciegos menor en las cercanías del centro ceremonial de Holmul en el cual abundan los motivos iconográficos Teotihuacanos y obsidiana importada de fuentes Mexicanas. Unas de las pinturas (Mural 9) es de contenido mitológico mientras la segunda (Mural 7) es de contenido histórico y es completamente textual. Ambas son de estilo y contenido Maya. El análisis de la iconografía y epigrafía de estos monumentos permite elaborar interpretaciones sobre la función de este complejo como sede temporal de los gobernantes del sitio. A esta información se adjunta la discusión del contexto arquitectónico y de artefactos asociados a los monumentos los cuales indican fuertes enlaces con Tikal. Estas evidencias aun si fragmentarias nos permiten una reconstrucción de las posibles modalidades en las cuales se dio el uso de dichos motivos Teotihuacanos en este caso específico y nos permiten aumentar el conocimiento sobre que papel pudo haber jugado la lejana Teotihuacan en las Tierras Bajas Maya del Clásico Temprano. Se ofrece una interpretación que enfoca en la política de intervención de Tikal sobre centros secundarios y que evita algunas posiciones extremas que se han presentado sobre este problema hasta ahora.

 Print