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SAA’s Online Seminar Series

SAA’s Online Seminar Series offers free and fee-based professional development opportunities designed for students and archaeologists seeking to enhance their skill sets or knowledge base.

Why take an online seminar from SAA?

  • Keep up to date on developments in the field with the help of a leading  expert.
  • Enhance your skill set and knowledge base quickly and easily in just an hour or two.
  • Advance in your job or career: Most SAA Online Seminars are RPA Certified and RPAs can receive Continuing Education Credit on the certified seminars.
  • Receive a certificate of completion from SAA .

Additional Information and Requirements  

General Information

  • Cancellations are allowed up to 14 days before the online seminar. All cancellations are subject to a $25 processing fee.
  • Each member-only SAA online seminar will accommodate 75 computer connections or "seats." All fee-based seminars will accommodate 40 "seats".

  • Registration for individual seminars closes one week prior to the start time or when the limit of  "seats" is filled.

  • Participants must have an internet connection and a computer with speakers to participate.

  • All one-hour, member-only online seminars will be recorded and available in our archive for SAA members. Two-hour seminars will not be recorded.
  • All times are in the Eastern Time Zone.

Group Registration

  • Two or more individuals sharing a single computer connection or "seat" may qualify for the group rate. Only the primary registrant is required to be an SAA member to receive SAA group-member pricing.
  • When registering groups, the primary registrant must submit the name and email address of each group participant in an Excel file seven days before the course date to elizabeth_pruitt@saa.org. We regret that we cannot add group participant names after that time. Only registered participants will receive certificates of completion once their participation had been verified by the primary registrant.

Contact Us

Online Seminar Series FAQ

Upcoming Courses

Registration for fee-based online seminars opens when the course description is posted. Registration for free online seminars opens approximately 12 days prior to the course date.

Check back often. Our list of online seminars will be growing soon.        

Recent Seminars

 

CRM in Latin America

Date/Time

September 28, 2017 12:00-1:00pm  ET Register!

Description

This course will be presented in Spanish.

Cultural resources management (CRM) around the world emerged within a context of economic growth. Infrastructure development, its main instrument, poses great risk to the preservation of heritage resources. CRM is a thriving industry contributing strongly to a country’s economy, while preserving heritage resources in the context of complex public and state negotiations. Latin America is a key market for world investment opportunities. With businesses being invited to Latin America to invest and exploit natural and cultural resources, archaeologists are facing many preservation challenges. Thus, there is a need to adapt to existing laws and definitions of cultural heritage. It is necessary to accept that insufficient training has been provided to heritage professionals and archaeologists to meet the regulations imposed by financial institutions—for example, in developing land-use plans or social and heritage impact assessments. Environmental companies are mostly doing this work now, as CRM companies are rare in Latin America. Building CRM capacity in Latin America requires new professional credentials, close collaborative efforts with experienced companies, and above all, new business heritage models and regulated standards that recognize the CRM industry as an effective heritage preservation industry in Latin America. In this one-hour, online presentation, the instructor explores these avenues to building a fair business market for heritage preservation in Latin America.

Objectives

The goals of this one-hour course are:

a. Learn the standing of CRM or Cultural Heritage Management in Latin America,

b. Understand cultural heritage, economic growth and development, and the laws and ethics of doing CRM business in Latin America; and

c. Understand the value of CRM for Latin America.

Instructor

Sandra L. López Varela received her Ph.D. in Archaeology from the University of London in 1996. After her working experience in CRM in the United States, she has dedicated her efforts to implement new perspectives to balance heritage preservation with economic growth and development. She has measured the effects of economic and social development policies to combat poverty on Mexico’s heritage, a research project awarded with the Bessel-Forschungspreis excellence in science of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. She held the Archaeology Seat at the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), served as Past President of the Society for Archeological Sciences, was elected recently as Treasurer of the Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología, and is a member of the Cultural Heritage Task Force of the AAA. She is general editor of the upcoming Wiley International Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences and has published articles in various journals, including Journal of Archaeological Science, American Anthropologist, and Advances in Archaeological Practice. She is a professor at Mexico’s National University (UNAM) where she teaches cultural heritage management and heritage business and marketing.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

Charging the Hill: A Guide to Survival

Date/Time

October 4, 2017 3:00-4:00pm  ET Register!

Description

American political parties have become more partisan lately. There are fewer and fewer moderates in Congress. However, agreement is possible and Senators and Representatives do listen to their constituents and national organizations. There are critical issues facing archaeology in the next few years. It is more important than ever for archaeologists to advocate now, during next year’s SAA Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, and thereafter. This seminar will include a brief review of American civics. It will describe steps that archaeologists can take to engage in the political process. SAA consists of highly experienced members who are passionate about the field and its importance to society. This course will help direct that passion into mobilized efforts to make a difference.

Objectives

The goals of this online course are to:

a. Prepare participants to advocate on behalf of issues of concern to archaeologists to American Senators, Representatives, and regional or local Federal department and agency offices,

b. Describe the systems and structure of Congressional offices; and

c. Direct participants to the resources that SAA provides, such as talking-points and alerts about upcoming legislation.

Instructor

John Brimsek is a volunteer with experience on and off Capitol Hill. He began his career working for a governor after college in 1972. He later worked in the US Senate and US House of Representatives. He has had a law/government relations practice in Washington, DC since 1989. For a total of 45 years of experience, Mr. Brimsek has been on both sides of the advocacy process.

Pricing

*This seminar is not RPA Certified and no credit will be given for taking this course.*
Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

Archaeological Curation and Collections Management: What You Need to Know but Never Learned in School

Date/Time

October 12, 2017 2:00-4:00pm  ET Register!

Description

This two-hour online seminar is intended for students who have never taken a course in archaeological collections management. It will be specifically useful for those with no formal collections management training, who are nearing graduation and about to enter the professional world of archaeology; and students majoring in anthropology who are considering a career focused on managing and/or caring for archaeological collections.

The three main goals of the seminar are to:

a. Provide attendees with an overview of preventive conservation; collections management policies and procedures; and the tasks associated with managing archaeological collections.


b. Teach participants about their roles and responsibilities as they relate to archaeological collections, to ensure that curation is effectively considered at each stage of the archaeological process.

c. Offer solutions and resources that participants can refer to as they encounter different collections management scenarios.

Objectives

After participating in the online seminar, participants will:

a. Gain a strong understanding of the principles of curation, the policies and procedures that make up an effective collections management program, and how they play an important part in the process of archaeology.

b. More fully understand their roles and responsibilities as they relate to the archaeological collections they generate and/or care for.

c. Be able to successfully apply the seminar concepts, solutions, and resources in their daily work routines, ensuring that collections are appropriately cared for and managed throughout the entire process of archaeology.

Instructor

In 2017, Danielle Benden launched Driftless Pathways, LLC, a museum consulting business.  As owner of Driftless Pathways, she develops collections assessments, provides guidance on collections planning and rehabilitation projects, and offers professional development training for small museums and historical societies.  She has taught Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses at the university level for over ten years. In addition, Ms. Benden has instructed a variety of professional development trainings including SAA online seminars for archaeologists, and tailored curatorial programs for small museum staff. She has more than 15 years of archaeological fieldwork experience, ten of which have been directing field projects.  She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado-Boulder. She served as the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2007-2016.

She is the current Chair of SAA’s Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation and serves on the Archaeological Collections Consortium. This work puts her at the forefront of the most current issues involving archaeological curation.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers
Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers


Archaeological Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanning

Date/Time

October 26, 2017 2:00-4:00pm  ET Register!

Description

Terrestrial laser scanning is becoming cheaper, smaller, faster, and more common. Is it the right technology for your project? Terrestrial laser scanning has become reasonably commonplace in archaeology, yet many potential users (and even current users) are not comfortable in determining the best applications and most efficient workflows for this technology. This two-hour seminar will provide enough background information and practical tips to enable participants to better evaluate and apply laser scanning to their work. The seminar will provide a starting point for beginners and help experienced users feel more confident in their decisions.

Objectives

The goals of this seminar are to help participants:

a. Better assess terrestrial laser scanning’s  applicability to their needs.

b. Become familiar with the current state-of-the-art technologies.

c. Compare terrestrial laser scanning to alternative/complementary technologies.


d. Learn efficient workflows and practices.

Instructor

Malcolm Williamson is a Research Associate with the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies (CAST). He has been using mid- to long-range terrestrial laser scanners for heritage, architectural, and geological applications for over a dozen years. Williamson has worked on five continents at major sites such as Machu Picchu, Amarna, and Petra. In addition, he has project and teaching experience in airborne LiDAR and photogrammetry and has contributed to the development of laser scanning metadata “best practices”. As CAST’s projects have a broad variety of objectives and range from simple visualization to temporal documentation, to object extraction and classification, Williamson is well positioned to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of laser scanning compared to alternative approaches for a wide range of applications.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers
Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers


Teaching Curation: A Guide to Developing a New, Stand-Alone Course or Integrating Curation into an Existing One

Date/Time

November 2, 2017 2:00-3:00pm  ET 

Description

This one-hour online seminar is intended for faculty who are interested in (1) developing a new, stand-alone archaeological curation and/or collections management course or (2) integrating topics of curation into existing curriculum.

Objectives

The three main goals of the seminar are to:

a. Provide faculty with a guide for creating a new, stand-alone course focused on archaeological curation or integrating curation into existing curriculum.

b. Offer participants pathways for developing the course description, content, objectives, and reading list.

c. Recommend strategies for determining which option is best (new course vs. integrating into existing curriculum).

Instructor

In 2017, Danielle Benden launched Driftless Pathways, LLC, a museum consulting business. As owner of Driftless Pathways, she develops collections assessments, provides guidance on collections planning and rehabilitation projects, and offers professional development training for small museums and historical societies. She has taught Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses at the university level for over ten years. In addition, Ms. Benden has instructed a variety of professional development trainings including SAA online seminars for archaeologists, and tailored curatorial programs for small museum staff. She has more than 15 years of archaeological fieldwork experience, ten of which have been directing field projects. She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado-Boulder. She served as the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2007-2016.

She is the current Chair of SAA’s Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation and serves on the Archaeological Collections Consortium. This work puts her at the forefront of the most current issues involving archaeological curation.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers


The 3D Printed Past

Date/Time

November 15, 2017 2:00-3:00pm  ET 

Description

Three-dimensional (3D) printing is increasingly infiltrating all aspects of society, from manufacturing and medicine to STEM education on K-12 levels. This seminar will explore the basics of 3D printing and how archaeologists can integrate 3D models and printed materials into the different facets of their discipline, from the field to the laboratory, and into the classroom and the museum. Particular attention will be paid to the following areas:

•    How digital 3D models enhance identification of artifacts and ecofacts in the field and laboratory over 2D drawings or photographs.

•    How 3D printed replicas expand opportunities for teaching and research at all levels of education, but especially for undergraduate teaching.

•    How 3D printed replicas can be incorporated into public outreach programs, maximizing access to the past, while minimizing risks to fragile heritage.

•    How 3D printed replicas can be integrated into museum exhibits to create a more interactive and tactile element.

The 3D printed past is not something from the far-off archaeology future, but should be seen as very much a part of the archaeological present.

Objectives

The overarching goal of this one-hour seminar is to show how 3D printing can expand archaeology pedagogy (including teaching in under-resourced schools), research, and particularly engagement with the public.

Instructor

Dr. Bernard K. Means founded the Virtual Curation Laboratory at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in August 2011 with a Department of Defense Legacy Resource Management funded-project to explore the applications of three-dimensional (3D) scanning technology to archaeology. A selection of the 3D models created over the past 6 years can be found at: http://Sketchfab.com/virtualcurationlab. He and his team of undergraduate VCU students soon began to dedicate their efforts to applications of 3D printing to archaeology, including in the realms of research, teaching, and especially public archaeology.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

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