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SAA’s Online Seminar Series

SAA’s Online Seminar Series offers free and fee-based professional development opportunities designed for students and archaeologists seeking to enhance their skill sets or knowledge base.

Why take an online seminar from SAA?

  • Keep up to date on developments in the field with the help of a leading  expert.
  • Enhance your skill set and knowledge base quickly and easily in just an hour or two.
  • Advance in your job or career: Most SAA Online Seminars are RPA Certified and RPAs can receive Continuing Education Credit on the certified seminars.
  • Receive a certificate of completion from SAA.

Upcoming Courses

Registration for fee-based online seminars opens when the course description is posted. Registration for free online seminars opens approximately 12 days prior to the course date.

Check back often as future seminars will be added to the list.

Recent Seminars

 

Building a Toolkit for the Heart-Centered Archaeologist

Date/Time

October 24, 2018 1:00-2:00pm  ET SOLD OUT!

Description

The concept of an ‘Archaeology of Heart’ originates in feminist and indigenous models of research and well-being that invite us to know and apply our full emotional, social, intuitive, and spiritual selves, as well as our best intellectual and rational selves, in our research, training, and outreach. While novel to archaeology, this emergent approach draws on the growing literatures of heart-centered practice in the humanities, caring professions, indigenous ontologies, and feminist scholarship. Heart-centered archaeologies provide new spaces for thinking through an integrated, responsible, and grounded archaeology, where we: (1) show care for the living and the dead; (2) recognize we are all emotional and social as well as intellectual beings; (3) act upon our needs for responsible relationships with each other, with a range of communities, and with archaeological records, and; (4) emphasize rigor not only in research and presentation, but in all our relational practices. A heart-centered approach to archaeological practice has the power to transform and add multi-dimensional value to how we conduct our professional practices as archaeologists both within and well beyond the discipline. In this online seminar, we build a toolkit for the heart-centered archaeologist.

Objectives

We will introduce the concept of a heart-centered practice to archaeological professionals, demonstrate its utility and applications, and show how it can be used effectively in community, classroom, field, managerial and other working contexts and situations. 

Instructor

Dr. Natasha Lyons received her PhD from the Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, in 2007. She is a founding partner of Ursus Heritage Consulting, which she owns and operates with her husband in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, Canada. She is also Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, a department with a long specialty in community archaeology. Natasha conducts collaborative, community-based research with First Nations and Inuit communities throughout Western Canada and the Arctic. She practices and publishes widely on subjects related to community archaeology, ethical research practice, digital representation, ethnobotany and palaeoethnobotany. Her first book was well received in both the archaeology and northern communities: Where the Wind Blows Us: Practicing Critical Community Archaeology with the Inuvialuit of the Canadian Western Arctic (2013, University of Arizona Press).  

Dr. Kisha Supernant is Métis and an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Alberta. She received her PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2011.  Her research with Indigenous communities in Canada explores how archaeologists and communities can build collaborative research relationships. Her research interests include the relationship between cultural identities, landscapes, and the use of space, Métis archaeology, and heart-centered archaeological practice. She specializes in the application of mapping methods to the human past and present, including the role of digital mapping and GIS spatial analysis in archaeological research. Her current research project, Exploring Métis Identity Through Archaeology (EMITA), takes a relational approach to exploring the material past of Métis communities, including her own family, in western Canada. She has published in local and international journals on GIS in archaeology, collaborative archaeological practice, indigenous archaeology, and conceptual mapping in digital humanities.

Dr. John R. Welch (RPA) is a Professor at Simon Fraser University, jointly appointed in the Department of Archaeology and School of Resource and Environmental Management. His doctorate (Anthropology) is from the University of Arizona (1996). He fell in love at first sight with Ndee (Western Apache) territory in 1984 and has served this passion in various professional capacities, including work as the archaeologist and historic preservation officer for the White Mountain Apache Tribe (1992-2005) and ongoing commitments as the board secretary for the nonprofit Fort Apache Heritage Foundation. He joined the SFU faculty in 2005 and directs the Professional Graduate Program in Heritage Resource Management. Recent publications include Dispatches from the Fort Apache Scout: White Mountain and Cibecue Apache History Through 1881, University of Arizona Press, 2016, and Archaeology as Therapy: Linking Community Archaeology to Community Health (Schaepe, Angelbeck, Snook, and Welch, 2017), Current Anthropology 58(4).

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

A Crash Course in the Fundamentals of Paleoethnobotany

Date/Time

October 30, 2018 2:00-4:00pm  ET Register!

Description

Today, archaeobotanical remains are regarded as a fundamental component of basic archaeological research. Despite a rapid increase in expectations that CRM professionals and academic researchers incorporate paleoethnobotany, opportunities for specialized training remain limited. This two-hour online seminar is intended as a crash course in practical field and laboratory methods for students, researchers, and CRM professionals interested in the fundamentals of paleoethnobotany. The seminar will focus on increasing participant familiarity with the basic principles of recovery and analysis of macrobotanical remains and equipping participants with sufficient knowledge to develop appropriate research modifications based on preservation conditions.

Objectives

The objectives for this course are to provide participants with:

a. An introduction to practical considerations in paleoethnobotanical research design;

b. Sufficient familiarity with field recovery methods to develop appropriate modifications as needed depending on the particular preservation context encountered; and

c. A foundation in macrobotanical identification, data collection, and reporting standards. 

Instructor

Heather B. Thakar, PhD, RPA is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Texas A&M University and the Director of the Paleoecology and Archaeometry Laboratory. Dr. Thakar earned her PhD from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2014. She has over 10 years of experience in Paleoethnobotany, including both private contracts for cultural resource management and NSF-funded academic research. She has published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of Archaeological Science, and Quaternary International among others. Working in Western North America, Mexico, and Central America she has encountered a diversity of preservation, recovery, and analytical challenges that inform her how she approach teaching Paleoethnobotany. She has developed and regularly instructs practical hands-on courses in Paleoethnobotany for advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers
Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

 

KNOWLEDGE SERIES: Is a shared past possible? Reflections on 25 years of research at Çatalhöyük, Turkey

Date/Time

November 1, 2018 2:00-3:00pm  ET SOLD OUT!

Description

The aim of this course is to reflect back on 25 years of research at the 9000 year old site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey. Over the past decades, the instructor has been leading a large team of about 160 people as they try to make sense of this intriguing mound or tell site. Çatalhöyük has 21 meters of occupation deposits consisting of multiple layers of houses with under-the-floor burials, roof entries, and elaborate wall art and symbolism. In this one-hour course, the instructor will explain the changes in methods over time as the archaeologists moved to paperless, digital techniques. He will also explain some of the main interpretive challenges for the archaeologists and how they solved them – what we now think about life at Çatalhöyük. But the instructor will also raise the question of if we have been successful in creating a shared past in which multiple stakeholders participate, and in applying community based participatory research. He will ultimately raise questions about whether it is really possible to decolonize archaeology.

Instructor

Ian Hodder was trained at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London and at Cambridge University where he obtained his PhD in 1975. After a brief period teaching at Leeds, he returned to Cambridge where he taught until 1999. During that time he became Professor of Archaeology and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy. In 1999 he moved to teach at Stanford University as Dunlevie Family Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Director of the Stanford Archaeology Center. His main large-scale excavation projects have been at Haddenham in the east of England and at Çatalhöyük in Turkey where he has worked since 1993. He has been awarded the Oscar Montelius Medal by the Swedish Society of Antiquaries, the Huxley Memorial Medal by the Royal Anthropological Institute, the Fyssen International Prize, the Gold Medal by the Archaeological Institute of America, and has Honorary Doctorates from Bristol and Leiden Universities. His main books include The leopard’s tale: revealing the mysteries of Çatalhöyük (2006 Thames and Hudson).

Pricing

*This seminar is not RPA Certified and no credit will be given for taking this course.*
Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

Experimental Archaeology: Context, Design, and Impact

Date/Time

November 15, 2018 2:00-4:00pm  ET Register!

Description

This seminar will focus on designing experimental research to test hypotheses by replicating cultural or past processes. It will highlight the importance of being informed of past experimental research and other archaeological research, the importance of developing experiments in a suitable manner, and making data available and usable to colleagues in order to increase the impact of experimental research. It will also cover experimental archaeology’s historical context, key concepts, and its relationship to experiential research and to interpretation.

The seminar is suitable for researchers, students, and museum professionals who are new to experimental archaeology, or who have not received formal training, and who are interested in including this method in their work. People familiar with experimental archaeology who want to increase the impact of their work by learning about new ways to make data more widely available and who want to learn more about work being conducted by EXARC and its members will also benefit from the seminar.

Objectives

After taking this course, participants will be able to:

a. Understand established ways of using of experimental archaeology in research and in public presentation, its relationship with experiential archaeology and interpretation, and basic terminology.

b. Understand the basics of designing an archaeological experiment and what makes an experiment different from an experiential exercise. The importance of technical knowledge acquisition will be discussed.

c. Identify sources of experimental information and data and understand the purpose and basics of recording experiment data and making it available as part of the research process.

Instructor Jodi Reeves Eyre holds a PhD in archaeology from the University of Exeter (2013), where she studied how experimental archaeology is perceived in archaeological research. She has worked with EXARC, the ICOM-affiliated organization representing archaeological open-air museums, experimental archaeology, ancient technology and interpretation, since 2010. She currently manages the EXARC Experimental Archaeology Collection in tDAR, has conducted participant observation of experimental projects, woven on models of ancient Greek looms, and painted people blue. Jodi is also a co-founder of Eyre & Israel, LLC, which provides research, editing, and digital curation consulting for non-profits, non-fiction publishers and authors, and cultural organizations.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers
Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

 

Integrating Drones into Archaeological Fieldwork

Date/Time

November 28, 2018 12:00-2:00pm  ET Register!

Description

This course is designed to provide basic information on the use of drones in archaeological mapping and other field contexts. Instructors will explore some of the variables that have to be considered in the planning, pre-flight, flight, and post-processing stages involved in the integration of Unmanned Aerial Systems. This course will also provide important information regarding the legal use of drones in accordance with associated federal regulations.

Objectives

Objectives for the course are to:

a. Familiarize seminar participants with drone formats and their potential applications.

b. Instruct participants on the basic workflow of drone use in archaeology (flight planning, permissions to fly, site preparation, automated and manual flights, post-flight processing of aerial imagery).

c. Provide information on the legal and safe operation of drones in the United States.

Instructor Michael T. Searcy, PhD, RPA has worked as an archaeologist in the Greater Southwest for the last 15 years in both academia and contract settings. He is currently an assistant professor of archaeology at Brigham Young University in the Department of Anthropology. Over the past five years, he and his colleague have been integrating drones into their research, including studies based in Mexico and Utah. They have also been working to refine UAV methods using multiple drone formats.

Scott M. Ure, MA is a research archaeologist for the Department of Anthropology at Brigham Young University and has worked at a variety of sites in the Great Basin, American Southwest, Middle East, and Mexico for 18 years. He is an FAA certified UAV pilot and has operated several different multi-rotor and fixed-wing unmanned aerial systems domestically and internationally for five years.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers
Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

 

Newer Developments in Technologies for the Measurement of Form and Space in Archaeology: Part II

Date/Time

December 6, 2018 2:00-3:00pm  ET 

Description

More than 60 years ago, Gordon Willey famously stated that the objectives of archaeology are “approached by the study and manipulation of three basic factors: form, space and time.” Since then, we have seen the huge impact that improved technologies for the measurement of time have had on the field. We are currently in the midst of a similar revolution in the methods for the measurement of space and form. This lecture updates one first offered by SAA in 2014 and is designed as a state-of-the-art introduction to these developments, specifically for archaeology students.

As a two-part series, Part II of this course examines analysis, display, and dissemination of High-Density Survey and Measurement (HDSM) data. Building on Part I, this lecture also provides further considerations and strategies for choosing the “best” approach in using these technologies.

Completing Part I of this course is not a requirement, but it is encouraged. It will be available to members in the SAA Online Seminar Series archive after September 27.

Objectives

At the end of this course the participants will be able to:

a. Define characteristics and archaeological and heritage management uses of new technologies and methods in high density survey (HDSM) methods (typically sub-millimeter to centimeter);

b. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches in consideration to specific project limitations; and

c. Describe the general process and tools of extraction, analysis, display, and dissemination of HDSM data.

Instructor

Fred Limp has been involved in the application of geomatics methods to archaeology for more than three decades. He was the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies for 18 years. He has served as PI or Co-PI on four major NSF projects applying geomatics to archaeology and heritage management and in 2013 he was appointed by Interior Secretary Salazar to the Board of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training.  He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate and short courses on the topic. He is a past-President of the SAA and was a founding Director of the Open Geospatial Consortium. OGC is the international body that developed spatial data interoperability specifications.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

Forensic Archaeology: Theory and Practice

Date/Time

December 11, 2018 2:00-4:00pm  ET Register!

Description

This two-hour seminar will introduce participants to the intersection of archaeological and forensic methods and techniques.  Through this course, participants will learn the ways that archaeology can provide standards of best practice for crime scene investigation. Participants will become familiar with both the theory behind forensic archaeology as well as the methods that distinguish it from other forms of archaeology.  Finally, the seminar will discuss the forensic recovery of human remains using archaeological techniques in order to maximize evidence recovery at outdoor crime scenes.

Objectives

After completing this course, participates will:

a. Understand and be able to articulate the core theoretical concepts that form the foundation of forensic archaeology today;

b. Understand how an outdoor scene should be processed using archaeological methods and how human remains should be excavated to ensure optimal evidence recovery; 

c. Be familiar with the tools, techniques, and data sources necessary for empirical analysis of environmental evidence; and

d. Be able to apply their understanding of core concepts and practical tools to the evaluation of real-world casework, including current crime scene processing procedures for outdoor scenes and clandestine grave excavation, and assess the practicality of utilizing environmental evidence.

Instructor

Kimberlee Sue Moran, MSc, RPA has been an archaeologist, educator, and forensic consultant since 2002. She holds an undergraduate degree in archaeology from Bryn Mawr College and a Master of Science degree in forensic archaeological science from the Institute of Archaeology at University College London. Kimberlee has worked on a number of cases in a range of capacities both in the UK and US. She provides forensic services and training to legal professionals. She helped to launch the JDI Centre for the Forensic Sciences in 2010 and has run an educational organization, Forensic Outreach, since 2004. Kimberlee is a member of the CSI sub-committee, part of the Organization of Scientific Area Committees under the National Institute for Science and Technology (NIST) tasked with establishing standards of best practice for forensic science.  She is an Associate Teaching Professor and Director of Forensic Science at Rutgers University – Camden.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers
Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

Additional Information and Requirements  

General Information

  • Cancellations are allowed up to 14 days before the online seminar. All cancellations are subject to a $25 processing fee.
  • Each member-only SAA online seminar will accommodate 75 computer connections or "seats." All fee-based seminars will accommodate 40 "seats".

  • Registration for individual seminars closes one week prior to the start time or when the limit of  "seats" is filled.

  • Participants must have an internet connection and a computer with speakers to participate.

  • One-hour, member only online seminars will be recorded and available in the Member Center's Online Seminar Archive for two years. Knowledge Series seminars will be available in the Archive indefinitely. The Archive is available only to members. Fee-based two-hour seminars will be recorded and made available to those who registered for up to one week after.
  • All times are in the Eastern Time Zone.

Group Registration

  • Two or more individuals sharing a single computer connection or "seat" may qualify for the group rate. Only the primary registrant is required to be an SAA member to receive SAA group-member pricing.
  • When registering groups, the primary registrant must submit the name and email address of each group participant in an Excel file seven days before the course date to elizabeth_pruitt@saa.org. We regret that we cannot add group participant names after that time. Only registered participants will receive certificates of completion once their participation had been verified by the primary registrant.

Contact Us

Online Seminar Series FAQ

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