Login Join | Annual Meeting | Career Center | SAANews | Marketplace | Contact   Search
 SAA's Online Seminar Series Minimize

SAA’s Online Seminar Series

SAA’s Online Seminar Series is designed for students and archaeologists seeking professional development opportunities.

Why take an online seminar from SAA?

  • Enhance your skill set and knowledge base quickly and easily in just an hour or two.
  • Keep up to date on developments in the field with the help of a leading  expert.
  • Advance in your job or career: you’ll receive a certificate of completion from SAA and RPAs will receive Continuing Education Credit. SAA Online seminars are RPA Certified.

Upcoming Courses

Registration for free online seminars opens approximately 30 days prior to the course date.

Check back often. Our list of online seminars will be growing soon.

Recent Seminars

 

Archaeological Curation for the 21st Century

Date/Time
Tuesday, September 30, 2014. Time: 1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT.  Click Here to register!

Description

This online webinar will:   (a) Provide a historical perspective on the curation crisis in Archaeology:  (b) Provide participants with a strong understanding of the entire process of archaeology, from pre-‐field planning through curation and: (c) Offer solutions and resources that can be used in daily tasks associated with development and maintenance of sound archaeological collections stewardship.

Objectives

After participating in the online seminar, attendees will: (1) Develop a strong understanding of the curation crisis in American archaeology, from both historical and current perspectives and use this information to inform their future decision-making processes. (2) Understand the responsibilities that archaeologists have to the collections they generate, be conversant in the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Federal Curation Regulations, 36 CFR 79, and utilize this information when making choices about curation. (3) Apply the concepts to address issues of curation in their work places.

Instructor

Danielle Benden is the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin--‐Madison. In addition to managing and providing access to the anthropological collections, she teaches Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses to undergraduates, and conducts her own archaeological research currently in southwestern Wisconsin. She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin--‐La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an Archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado--‐Boulder. 

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

The National Science Foundation Archaeology Program: Insight into the Grant Application and Award Process

Date/Time

October 9, 2014, 3:00-4:00 EDT

Description

 This one-hour online seminar is designed for graduate students as well as more senior researchers--both archaeologists and individuals in related disciplines--who might consider submitting proposals to the NSF Archaeology Program or other relevant NSF competitions. The central goal of the seminar is to explain to potential applicants how the Archaeology Program at NSF is organized and functions. The grant application process will be explained and the characteristics of successful proposals described. Advice will be provided and specific questions answered through question and answer interaction.

Objectives

Participants in the online seminar will: 1) Gain sufficient knowledge regarding the Archaeology Program’s goals, individual competitions, potential and limitations to determine whether it would make sense to consider an application submission: 2) Receive advice on proposal writing and insight into how proposals are evaluated, and receive useful information for crafting a successful application: and 3) Have the opportunity to ask, and receive answers to specific questions they may have. These likely will be of broader general interest.

Instructor

John Yellen directs the Archaeology Program at NSF and thus has unique insight into how it functions. As an employee of NSF for many years he also has knowledge of other archaeologically-relevant competitions.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

 

Introduction to Teaching Forensic Archaeology

Date/Time

October 29, 2014, 2:00-4:00 PM EDT. Click Here to register!

Description

This online seminar in Forensic Archaeology provides a basic introduction to the benefits and the problems encountered in applying archaeological field recovery and analytical techniques in forensic science contexts. Participants who are or anticipate becoming college professors may choose to use the seminar as the first step in the development of an undergraduate course in forensic archaeology. The seminar explores positive contributions that traditional archaeological strategies, tactics, and techniques can make to forensic science.

Objectives

The primary goal of the online seminar is to introduce participants to the special problems encountered in the application of archaeological techniques to crime, accident, or disaster scene investigations. The focus is on ways in which archaeology can contribute to forensic science but with emphasis on the adaptations that must be made to standard archaeological techniques to make them useful in that context. The seminar will be helpful to archaeologists considering the development of an undergraduate course of study in archaeological science as a contributing course in a broader forensic science curriculum.

Instructor

Dean Snow has fifty years of experience in archaeological research and in the teaching of archaeology. He is a past president of the Society for American Archaeology. In 2006, Snow developed a course in Forensic Archaeology (427W) for the Department of Anthropology and the then new program in Forensic Science at The Pennsylvania State University, which he taught for seven years.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

New Developments in Teachnologies for the Measurement of Form and Space in Archaeology: An Introduction for Students

Date/Time
November 6, 2014, 2:00-4:00 PM EST

Description

Exactly 60 years ago Gordon Willey famously stated that the objectives of archaeology are “approached by the study and manipulation of three basic factors: form, space and time.” Since then we have seen the huge impact that improved technologies for the measurement of time have had on the field. We are currently in the midst of a similar revolution in the methods for the measurement of space and form. The workshop is designed as an introduction to these developments - providing an accessible review of the characteristics and uses of such methods as high-resolution GNSS, “laser scanning,” close range photogrammetry and related methods for the measurement of space and form of landscapes, sites, structures and objects.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to (a) assess the capabilities of different strategies, (b) the costs and benefits of the various technologies,  and (c) assess whether they may be of value to their projects.  They will be able to characterize the basic differences in the technologies and how they may be applied in archaeological and heritage contexts.

 

Instructors

Fred Limp has been involved in the application of geomatics methods to archaeology for more than three decades. He was the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies for 18 years. He has served as PI or Co-PI on four major NSF projects applying geomatics to archaeology and heritage management and in 2013 he was appointed by Interior Secretary Salazar to the Board of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training.  He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate and short courses on the topic. He is also a past president of the SAA.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

 

Proposal Writing in Cultural Resource Management

Date/Time

November 18, 2014, 9:00 – 11:00 AM EST. Click Here to register!

Description

The seminar will provide an overview of the proposal-writing process in CRM.  The focus will be on competitive proposals for government clients, but many of the lessons will have cross-application to private-sector work.  The course will emphasize the importance of carefully evaluating each opportunity and developing an appropriate Go/No Go process.  This will include detailed advice on reading an RFP.  The course will stress that you have to have an angle, if you hope to have a winning proposal, and that your proposal must be properly designed to highlight your strengths.  The seminar will discuss in detail the difference between generic claims and actual proofs.  The course examples will be drawn from Espenshade’s experience, and will cover the Midwest, Northeast, MidAtlantic, Southeast, and Caribbean.   

Objectives

The goals of the seminar are: 1) to educate (or refresh) the students on the different factors that lead to a successful proposal; 2) to better organize or regiment the proposal-writing process; and 3) to provide the tools by which the participants can increase their return from their proposal efforts. 

Participants will come from this online seminar with an understanding that 1) not every firm should be chasing every opportunity.  Each firm should have a well-defined Go/NoGo process;  2) that the proposal-writer must know what gives their firm a good chance of winning the job before they begin writing a proposal; and 3) proposals should be focused on providing proofs. 

Instructor

Chris Espenshade is a Registered Professional Archaeologist with more than 28 years of supervisory experience in cultural resource management (CRM).  He holds an MA in anthropology from the University of Florida and a BA in anthropology from Wake Forest University.  Chris has worked for a number of major CRM and engineering firms, including: New South Associates; Skelly and Loy; Garrow & Associates/TRC Associates; and Brockington and Associates.  Chris currently serves as the Regional Director in CCRG’s Jackson, Michigan office.  He had proposal-writing duties at all of these firms, and wrote successful competitive proposals for a full range of federal, state, and private-sector clients. 

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

An Introduction to the Section 106 Process

Date/Time

December 2, 2014 , 1:00-3:00PM EST. Click Here to register!

Description

This two-hour online seminar is intended for archaeologists who want an initial understanding of the Section 106 process

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to outline the basic Section 106 process, identify the participants involved in the process, and summarize its procedures following 36CFR800. In addition students will know the basic provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act.

Instructor

Thomas Green is an independent teacher, scholar, and consultant regarding cultural resource management and former director of the Arkansas Archaeological Survey.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA members/$129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

The Conservation and Managemnet of Rock Art: An Integrated Approach

Date/Time

Thursday,  January 22, 2015,  2:00-4:00PM EST. Click Here to register!

Description

 Compared to the attention that archaeologists have given to conventional archaeological features and artifacts that are partly or fully buried within deposits , exposed rock art surfaces that contain petroglyphs and pictographs have paradoxically been overlooked and so many have accordingly suffered from neglect. This course shows that being fixed in place, rock art sites contain unique features that allow us to understand the past and the ongoing significance of these enduring places,  which along with indigenous significance and general public interest , are sufficient reason for their appropriate study, management,  and conservation.

Objectives

The online seminar will introduce archaeologists to basic principles and procedures regarding rock art conservation and management.  Participants will come away understanding:  1) Rock art conservation decisions are intricately tied to site variables,  various significance values, the input of stakeholders and how sites are represented to the public.  2) The unique ways in which location, history, significance values, condition, management context, stakeholders, and site preservation determine how a site is best managed and conserved.  3) Knowledge of the rock surface has shown that a number of pre-conceptions concerning rock weathering are flawed.

Instructor

Johannes Loubser is a Research Associate at the University of Witwatersrand’s Rock Art Research Institute and the Lamar Institute in Georgia. He has worked at rock art sites in various regions of the U.S. and Canada, the Caribbean Islands, Mexico, Bolivia, and the Hawaiian archipelago. Loubser  has written book chapters and lectured extensively on rock art site management and conservation.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

Introduction to Archaeological Digital Data Management

Date/Time

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:00 – 2:00 PM EST. Click Here to register!

Description

This online seminar will introduce participants to the background of archaeological data management, how good data management is organized, and tools and methods that they can integrate into their existing project and research workflows to ensure good management of digital data.

Objectives

After the seminar participants will be able to: 1) identify good digital data management practice as it relates to the topics of data storage, data archiving, long-term preservation, and the access and reuse of digital data; 2) produce a data management plan for a current or future projects; and 3) be able to identify and use the many tools, applications, and websites available to help manage and curate digital archaeological data.

Instructors

Francis P. McManamon, RPA, is the Executive Director of Digital Antiquity. Issues and topics related to the management of archaeological data and information is one of his professional focuses. Digital Antiquity develops and maintains tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record), an international repository for data and documents related to archaeology and archaeological investigations.

Jodi Reeves Flores is a Digital Curator and the CLIR/DLF Fellow in Data Curation for the Sciences and Social Sciences at Arizona State University Libraries and the Center for Digital Antiquity (Digital Antiquity).

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

Publishing Your First Artical in American Antiquity

Date/Time

Friday, March 13, 2015, 3:00-4:00 PM EST

Description

This one-hour seminar offers a concise primer on the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript to American Antiquity.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to determine if their work is suited for publication in American Antiquity; they will understand the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript; and they will take away tips for effective manuscript revision. The intended audience is first-time contributors to American Antiquity, including graduate students.

Instructor

Dr. Kenneth Sassaman is the sitting Editor of American Antiquity, with 30+ years of experience in the profession, including abundant publishing experience.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

Fundamentals of Budgeting for Archaeology Projects

Date/Time

Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 1:00 - 3:00 PM EST. Click Here to register!

Description

 This course will focus on the fundamentals of budgeting for an archaeology project, drawing on the instructor’s 30+ years of experience in creating budgets for cultural resource management projects.  It will examine how budgets are developed for different kinds of contracts and for various types of archaeology projects.  Practical examples will be given to highlight the concepts taught, and common budgeting pitfalls will be identified. The course is appropriate for recent college graduates, graduate students, and junior-level archaeological staff members.

Objectives

The seminar will introduce participants to the basic principles underlying budgeting for an archaeology project.  Although presented from a CRM perspective, the concepts introduced are also applicable to budgeting for grants. After participating in the online seminar, attendees will be able to:  1) Calculate overhead/indirect project costs.  2) Estimate labor costs. And 3) Estimate direct project costs.

Instructor

Susan M. Chandler is a Registered Professional Archaeologist with 37 years of experience on prehistoric and historic investigations in the western United States.  Until her retirement in 2013, Ms Chandler was President of Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc., a CRM firm in Colorado that she founded in 1987. 

As President of Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Ms. Chandler was in charge of overall company management. She monitored general operating costs, enforced company policies and procedures, and oversaw the planning, implementation, coordination, and monitoring of all projects.  She negotiated all contract budgets and tracked project hours and direct expenses to stay within established schedules and budgets. 

Ms. Chandler is Past-President of the Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists and the American Cultural Resources Association.  She served as Treasurer for the Society for American Archaeology and serves on the SAA Investment and Finance Committee.  She is the current SAA Liaison to the RPA.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

Archaeo-politics-making archaeology matter to policymakers

Date/Time
Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Time: 1:00 PM–2:00 PM EST. Sold Out

Description

Creating and maintaining good relationships with legislative and regulatory offices is critical to communicating the importance of the archaeological record to our stakeholders. This online webinar will provide background knowledge and strategies necessary to accomplish this.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will understand: 1) The scope of government involvement in archaeology; 2) Why policymakers need to be kept actively apprised of developments in the science and of issues affecting the discipline; and 3)  how to talk to Members of Congress and agency personnel, in order to get your message across.

Instructor

David Lindsay has served for twelve years as the SAA’s Manager of Government Affairs. His previous work experience included lobbying for an agriculture trade association and six years serving as a staff person on Capitol Hill for three Members of Congress.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

Introduction to Archaeological Damage Assessment

Date/Time
Tuesday, March 4, 2014. Time: 3:00 PM–5:00 PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This seminar will provide participants with an introduction to the processes, procedures, and legal requirements for archaeological damage assessment.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will understand what archaeological damage assessment is and the legal basis for it, they will understand the procedures involved in archaeological damage assessment, and they will understand the professional qualifications necessary to conduct archaeological damage assessments and the legal standards for providing expert witness testimony.

Instructor

Martin E. McAllister, RPA, formed the company now known as Archaeological Damage Assessment & Investigation that specializes in consulting and training on archaeological damage assessment and the investigation and prosecution of archaeological violations. He is the author of National Park Service Technical Brief 20 entitled Archeological Resource Damage Assessment: Legal Basis and Methods.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

Introduction to Digital Repositories for Archaeological Materials: tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record)

Date/Time
Thursday, March 13, 2014. Time: 2:00 PM–3:00 PM EST. Sold Out

Description

This seminar will introduce participants to the types of digital repositories that are available and where they can browse, access and download archaeological documents, data sets, images and other kinds of archaeological information. Archaeologists, whether they work in CRM, for government agencies, or in academic positions, can use digital repositories to store, organize and promote their archaeological work. Using tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record) as a case study, participants will learn how to access and use resources in the repository and curate and manage CRM reports, data sets, photographs, GIS files and other archaeologically relevant digital resources.

Objectives

Participants will learn about several of the different digital repositories that are available, how to enhance their research by searching for archaeological “grey literature” online, including documents, data sets, images, and other supplementary information that supports published reports and manuscripts. They will also learn how to use the tDAR digital repository to store, edit, manage and preserve their digital archaeological files and projects. This will include how to use the different features and tools in tDAR to actively curate their data, for example, by controlling access permissions to confidential archaeological information.

Instructors

Dr. Jodi Reeves Flores, RPA and Leigh Anne Ellison, RPA, Center for Digital Antiquity.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

Introduction to Archaeological Digital Data Management

Date/Time
Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Time: 2:00 PM–4:00 PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This online seminar will introduce participants to the background of archaeological data management, how good data management is organized, and tools and methods that they can integrate into their existing project and research workflows to ensure good management of digital data..

Objectives

After the seminar participants will be able to: 1) identify good digital data management practice as it relates to the topics of data storage, data archiving, long-term preservation, and the access and reuse of digital data; 2) produce a data management plan for a current or future projects; and 3) be able to identify and use the many tools, applications, and websites available to help manage and curate digital archaeological data.

Instructors

Francis P. McManamon, RPA, is the Executive Director of Digital Antiquity. Issues and topics related to the management of archaeological data and information is one of his professional focuses. Digital Antiquity develops and maintains tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record), an international repository for data and documents related to archaeology and archaeological investigations.

Jodi Reeves Flores is a Digital Curator and the CLIR/DLF Fellow in Data Curation for the Sciences and Social Sciences at Arizona State University Libraries and the Center for Digital Antiquity (Digital Antiquity).

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

Publishing Your First Article in American Antiquity

Date/Time
Friday, February 21, 2014. Time: 2:00 PM–4:00 PM EST, Sold Out! 

Description

This one-hour seminar offers a concise primer on the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript to American Antiquity.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to determine if their work is suited for publication in American Antiquity; they will understand the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript; and they will take away tips for effective manuscript revision. The intended audience is first-time contributors to American Antiquity, including graduate students.

Instructor

Dr. Kenneth Sassaman is the sitting Editor of American Antiquity, with 30+ years of experience in the profession, including abundant publishing experience.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

An Introduction to the Section 106 Process

Date/Time
January 28, 2014. Time: 12:00 noon-2:00 PM EST, Sold Out!

Description

The two-hour online seminar is intended for archaeologists who want an initial understanding of the Section 106 process.

Objectives

Participants will be able to outline the basic Section 106 process, identify the participants involved in the process, and summarize its procedures following 36CFR800. In addition, the student will know the basic provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act.

Instructor

Thomas Green, RPA, is an independent teacher, scholar, and consultant regarding cultural resource management and former director of the Arkansas Archaeological Survey.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

New Developments in Technologies for the Measurement of Form and Space in Archaeology: An Introduction for Students

Date/Time
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM– 12:00 noon EST, Sold Out!

Description

Participants (particularly students) will learn the characteristics and archaeological and heritage management uses of new technologies and methods in high precision survey methods (typically sub-millimeter to centimeter) using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and “laser scanning” (and other related technologies such as close range photogrammetry and structure light measurement systems) for landscapes, sites, structures and objects..

Objectives

Participants will be able to assess the capabilities of different strategies, assess the costs and benefits of the various technologies, and assess whether they may be of value to their projects. They will be able to characterize the basic differences in the technologies and how they may be applied in archaeological and heritage contexts.

Instructor

Fred Limp has been involved in the application of geomatics methods to archaeology for more than three decades. He was the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies for 18 years. He has served as PI or Co-PI on four major NSF projects applying geomatics to archaeology and heritage management and in 2013 he was appointed by Interior Secretary Salazar to the Board of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate and short courses on the topic.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

Public Archaeology is a Moving Target

Date/Time
November 14, 2013, 3:00 PM EDT-5:00 PM, Sold Out!

Description

This seminar is designed to give an overview of public archaeology as it is practiced in the United States today.

Objectives

Attendees will come away with an understanding of three main categories of public archaeology: (1) cultural resource management (CRM) or cultural heritage management (CHM) under public law; (2) outreach and education with the intention to prevent looting and vandalism of archaeological places and to combat the illicit international trade in antiquities; and (3) archaeology that aims to help communities or individuals in some way or to solve societal problems.

Instructor

Dr. Barbara J. Little, RPA, works on public archaeology issues of public outreach and involvement, evaluation and official designations of archaeological places, and on the public relevance of archaeology and cultural heritage. She is the Program Manager for the Cultural Resources Office of Outreach for the U.S. National Park Service in Washington, DC and Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

Archaeological Applications of Airborne Laser Scanning

Date/Time

September 17, 2013, 11:00AM EDT-1:00PM, Sold Out!

Description

Airborne Laser scanning (ALS, also known as lidar or LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology used to create detailed and accurate 3D models of the earth’s surface and objects on it over extensive areas.  This two-hour online seminar aims to promote the use of ALS within archaeology by providing an overview of the technology, its potential applications in research and management, and examples of successful projects.

Objectives

1. Assess the quality of raw ALS data and its appropriateness for their project.

2. Visually interpret ALS based terrain models and point clouds.

3. Critique or develop a proposal that includes ALS as part of a broader research or heritage management project.

Instructor

Dr. Rachel Optiz, RPA, received her PhD in Archaeology from the University of Cambridge in 2009. Her doctoral project was one of the first to use airborne laser scanning to study archaeological landscapes.  She is currently chief topographer for the Gabii Project (Kelsey Museum, University of Michigan) and is using photogrammetry to document the excavations, making detailed 3D models of the site as it is being uncovered in order to help excavators understand the complex stratigraphy and inter-relating structures.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members 

 

Get Hired!

Date/Time

October 30, 2013, 2:00 PM EDT-3:00 PM, Sold Out!

Description

This one-hour online seminar will help both graduate and undergraduate archaeology students and recent graduates in their transition from student to a career.

Objectives

After participating in this online seminar, students will be able to: 1) Identify potential employers. 2) More accurately read and respond to job announcements. 3) Link their current knowledge, skills, and abilities gained in school and in prior jobs to those being sought after by employers.

Instructor

Ms. Carol J. Ellick, RPA, Director of Archaeological and Cultural Education Consultants, holds a B.A. in anthropology from The Evergreen State College (1981) and a M.A. in education, with a specialization in curriculum and instruction, from Chapman University (1992). Ms. Ellick is considered one of the leading experts in archaeological education and the development of public programs in the United States. 

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

Additional Information and Requirements  

General Information

  • Cancellations are allowed up to 30 days before the online seminar. All cancellations are subject to a $25 processing fee.
  • Each member-ony SAA online seminar will accommodate 50 computer connections or "seats." All fee-based seminars will accomodate 35 "seats".

  • Registration for individual seminars closes 24 hours prior to the start time or when the limit of  "seats" is filled.

  • Participants must have an internet connection and a computer with speakers to participate.

  • Member-only online seminars may be recorded for future broadcast to SAA members.

Group Registration

  • Two or more individuals sharing a single computer connection or "seat" may qualify for the group rate. Only the primary registrant is required to be an SAA member to receive SAA group-member pricing.
  • When registering groups, all participants must be registered at the same time by the primary registrant. No additions may be made after registration. Only registered participants will receive certificates of completion once their participation had been verified by the primary registrant.

Contract Us

 Print