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 Archaeological Curation for the Twenty-First Century

Date/Time

May 4, 2017 2:00-4:00pm  ET Sold Out!

Description

Archaeological collections stewardship begins before an archaeologist steps foot into the field, and continues well after the recovered collections reach the repository. This two-hour online seminar provides participants with an understanding of the curation crisis and the responsibilities that archaeologists have to the collections they generate. Participants will learn about preventive conservation and the real costs of long-term curation, and gain practical skills in project development, culling and sampling strategies, deaccessioning, and preparing collections for the repository to ensure their long term care, access, and use. This seminar is especially designed for those who work in the CRM industry.

Objectives

After participating in the online seminar, attendees will:

a. Develop a strong understanding of the curation crisis in American archaeology, from both historical and current perspectives and use this information to inform their future decision-making processes.

b. Understand the responsibilities that archaeologists have to the collections they generate, be conversant in the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Federal Curation Regulations, 36 CFR 79, and utilize this information when making choices about curation.

c. Apply the concepts to address issues of curation in their work places.

Instructor

In 2017, Danielle Benden launched Driftless Pathways, LLC, a museum consulting business.  As owner of Driftless Pathways, she develops collections assessments, provides guidance on collections planning and rehabilitation projects, and offers professional development training for small museums and historical societies.  She has taught Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses at the university level for over ten years. In addition, Ms. Benden has instructed a variety of professional development trainings including SAA online seminars for archaeologists, and tailored curatorial programs for small museum staff. She has more than 15 years of archaeological fieldwork experience, ten of which have been directing field projects.  She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado-Boulder. She served as the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2007-2016.

She is the current Chair of SAA’s Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation and serves on the Archaeological Collections Consortium. This work puts her at the forefront of the most current issues involving archaeological curation.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

 

Introduction to Archaeological Damage Assessment

Date/Time

April 18, 2017 2:00-4:00pm  ET Sold Out!

Description

This online seminar is intended for professional archaeologists employed by government agencies or archaeological contracting firms. It will provide participants with an introduction to archaeological damage assessment. It will begin with a discussion of what archaeological damage assessment is and the legal basis for it.  Next, the seminar will identify the components of archaeological damage assessment and the roles, responsibilities and timeframes involved. This will be followed by an overview of the procedures involved in: 

a. field damage assessment

b. determination of values and costs as measures of harm for archaeological damage;

c.
damage assessment report preparation.  

The seminar will conclude with a brief discussion of the legal standards for expert witness testimony and the importance of qualifications necessary to meet these standards.

Objectives

The goals of this online seminar are to provide an introduction to archaeological damage assessment and to show participants what roles they are qualified to perform in the archaeological damage assessment process.
After taking the seminar participants will:

a. Understand what archaeological damage assessment is and the legal basis for it

b. Understand the procedures involved in archaeological damage assessment;

c. Understand the professional qualifications necessary to conduct each of the components of archaeological damage assessment and the legal standards for expert witness testimony.  

Instructors

Forensic Archaeologist Martin McAllister, MA, RPA, has been involved in archaeological damage assessment since 1974, when he worked with the Forest Service. After leaving the Forest Service in 1985, McAllister formed the firm of Archaeological Damage Assessment & Investigation (ADIA) which specialized in consulting and training on archaeological damage assessment and the investigation and prosecution of archaeological violations. In 2015, ADIA became part of Northland Research, Inc., an archaeological contracting firm based in Arizona. McAllister has conducted or been directly involved in 36 archaeological damage assessment projects, including the archaeological damage assessment for the Exxon-Valdez Oil Spill. He is also the author of National Park Service Technical Brief 20 entitled Archeological Resource Damage Assessment: Legal Basis and Methods.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

What's the Use? Using Archaeological Collections for Research, Outreach, and Exhibition

Date/Time

February 15, 2017 3:00-4:00pm  ET SOLD OUT!

Description

This seminar is intended for faculty who would like to encourage their undergraduate and graduate students to utilize existing collections for research; students and researchers who are interested in learning more about how to find existing collections and incorporate them into their work; and personnel who work in museums, university repositories, and other curatorial facilities where the mission is focused on research, outreach, and exhibition. The three main goals of the seminar are to:

a. Promote the value of and offer strategies for utilizing existing archaeological collections for a variety of purposes (e.g., research, outreach, and exhibition).

b. Teach participants how to incorporate the use of existing collections into their research projects and outreach activities.

c. Offer strategies for finding existing collections within repositories, and provide exemplary case studies that highlight the ways in which institutions and individuals are successfully utilizing collections.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to:

a. Have a strong understanding of the value of using existing collections for a variety of activities.

b. Apply strategies for utilizing existing collections in their workplace.

c. Utilize the resources and case studies to develop their own methods of incorporating existing collections into research, outreach, and/or exhibition activities.

Instructors

Danielle Benden served as the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2007-2016. In 2017, she launched Driftless Pathways, LLC, a museum consulting business.  As owner of Driftless Pathways, she develops collections assessments, provides guidance on collections planning and rehabilitation projects, and offers professional development training for small museums and historical societies.  She has taught Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses at the university level for over ten years. In addition, Ms. Benden has instructed a variety of professional development trainings including SAA online seminars for archaeologists, and tailored curatorial programs for small museum staff. She has more than 15 years of archaeological fieldwork experience, ten of which have been directing field projects.  She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado-Boulder.

She is the current Chair of SAA’s Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation and serves on the Archaeological Collections Consortium. This work puts her at the forefront of the most current issues involving archaeological curation.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

Addressing Orphaned Collections: A Practical Approach

Date/Time

February 2, 2017 2:00-4:00pm ET SOLD OUT!

Description

Orphaned collections affect every sector of archaeology. This seminar will provide guidance for working through the process of remedying orphaned collections by offering a framework by which to understand what they are and how they became orphaned, so as to prevent similar circumstances in the future. A resource guide is offered to participants, outlining specific criteria and procedures for determining appropriate methods to resolve issues associated with orphaned collections. This seminar will be beneficial for students nearing graduation, CRM employees, academics, and government personnel.

Objectives

The three main goals of the seminar are to:

a. Provide attendees with a framework by which to understand, discuss, and remedy problems associated with orphaned archaeological collections.

b. Teach participants about their roles, responsibilities, and rights as they relate to orphaned collections.

c. Offer solutions and resources to those who would like to resolve issues and concerns associated with orphaned collections.
Instructor

Danielle Benden served as the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2007-2016. In 2017, she launched Driftless Pathways, LLC, a museum consulting business.  As owner of Driftless Pathways, she develops collections assessments, provides guidance on collections planning and rehabilitation projects, and offers professional development training for small museums and historical societies.  She has taught Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses at the university level for over ten years. In addition, Ms. Benden has instructed a variety of professional development trainings including SAA online seminars for archaeologists, and tailored curatorial programs for small museum staff. She has more than 15 years of archaeological fieldwork experience, ten of which have been directing field projects.  She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado-Boulder.

She is the current Chair of SAA’s Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation and serves on the Archaeological Collections Consortium. This work puts her at the forefront of the most current issues involving archaeological curation.

Pricing Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act: NAGPRA Fundamentals

Date/Time

January 25, 2017 2:00-4:00pm ET SOLD OUT!

Description

All archaeologists need a basic understanding of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the federal legislation that was passed in 1990. This two-hour online seminar will provide participants with a brief overview of the legislative history of NAGPRA and its historical context; a comprehensive guide to who must comply with the law, who has standing, and what items are covered; and an overview of the compliance processes.

Objectives

The objectives of this seminar are for participants to:

a. understand that NAGPRA did not create new rights, but instead codified for Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and lineal descendants the same rights everyone else in the US was already afforded;


b. comfortably refer to the law and regulations whenever questions arise; and

c. have a basic understanding of who must comply, what is covered, and what “standing” means and who has it.

Instructor Jan Bernstein, M.S., is the Managing Director of Bernstein & Associates, LLC, which she founded in 2003. Since the passage of NAGPRA, Jan has worked together with Indian tribes throughout the lower 48, Alaska Native villages, Native Hawaiian organizations, museums, and federal agencies on all aspects of NAGPRA implementation.
Pricing Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $179 for SAA nonmembers

Introduction to Publishing in Advances in Archaeological Practice

Date/Time

January 19, 2017 3:00-4:00pm ET SOLD OUT!

Description

In this hour long seminar, participants will be introduced to SAA’s newest journal, Advances in Archaeological Practice by one of its editors, Sarah Herr. After participants are familiarized with the journal, Herr will dive into how to publish an article in the journal by discussing article preparation and the mechanics of submitting an article. The seminar will also address legal and ethical publishing and what makes publishing in a digital journal different from publishing in traditional SAA publications. This seminar will be beneficial to individuals new to publishing or new to publishing in Advances.

Objectives

The goal of the seminar is to educate participants about the SAA journals, identify the expectations of authors and editors, with the intent of helping them succeed in their publishing goals. After taking the online seminar, participants will be able to:

a.    Identify whether Advances in Archaeological Practice is the journal that best fits their publishing needs,

b.     Prepare and upload a manuscript to the journal software, and

c.    Advance their knowledge of modern publishing ethics.

Instructor Sarah Herr, Ph.D, RPA, together with Christina Rieth, Sjoerd van der Linde and Sara Perry, comprise the new editorial team for the journal, Advances in Archaeological Practice.  Since Herr was appointed by SAA in May 2015, she has been working with the other editors to develop and implement their vision for the journal.
Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

Tribal Consultation Basics

Date/Time

December 1, 2016   2:00-4:00pm ET

Description

The goal of this two-hour online seminar is to offer participants insights into the processes of tribal consultation, as well as a broader picture of the ways that culture influences interactions between individuals engaged in those consultations.

Objectives

 After completing the course, participants will be able to define “consultation’; will understand both the role and the legal basis for consultation within the federal Historic Preservation and NEPA processes; will understand both the role and responsibilities of the parties involved in the consultation; and will be able to define the types, styles and characteristics of communication and how these impact and influence the consultation process.

Instructor

Joe Watkins has been involved in archaeology for more than 45 years, and has seen it grow from one of more scientific imperialism to one that is more engaged with concerns of descendant communities worldwide. He has taught workshops on tribal consultation at the national, regional, and local levels, with emphasis on both the federal side and the tribal side depending on the audience. As a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, Watkins also brings a cultural perspective to the topic that few others can bring. He has published widely on the topic of consultation in the broader sense.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $159 for SAA nonmembers

Yes, You CAN Do That! Creative Mitigation and Section 106 Undertakings

Date/Time

November 15, 2016, 2:00-4:00  ET 

Description

This two-hour online seminar is designed for current and potential future cultural resource managers, private sector cultural resource firms, and agency personnel.  The goals of the online seminar are:

 a. To encourage current and potential future cultural resource managers, consultants, and regulators to think outside the box that currently constitutes standard practice for mitigating adverse effects to historic properties as a result of development activities.

b. To explore good examples of more creative approaches to mitigation.

c. To provide guidance on what constitutes appropriate creative approaches.

Objectives

Participants will learn:

a. That the Section 106 process, as defined in regulation, allows great flexibility in designing the measures to mitigate adverse effects on historic properties.

b. That the determining factors in designing good, creative mitigation are:  the needs of the affected resources, the needs of the undertaking, and the relative public benefits.

c. That creative mitigation need not be more costly, more time-consuming, or more complicated than “business as usual,” and indeed may be less costly, time-consuming, and/or complicated.

Instructors

Lynne Sebastian Ph.D., RPA, and Terry Klein M.A., RPA, have a combined total of nearly 70 years working in the field of cultural resource management. They have experience as CRM consultants, in a State Historic Preservation Office, in a federal agency, and since 2002 have been principals in a nonprofit foundation with a historic preservation mission.  They have developed and taught courses on Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, and Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act.   They have taught these classes for State Departments of Transportation, various federal land-managing agencies, Indian tribes, private sector consulting firms, development industries, and the universities of New Mexico and Maryland.

Pricing

Individual Registrations: $99 for SAA members and $139 for SAA nonmembers Group Registrations: $139 for SAA members and $159 for SAA nonmembers

Working With Metal Detectorists:  Citizen Science at historic Montpelier and
Engaging a New Constituency

Date/Time

November 10, 2016   3:00-4:00 p.m. ET  

Description

Historical Archaeologists have a long and tumultuous history with metal detectorists (aka relic hunters, looters, etc).  This seminar will discuss how to practically engage with this group through hands-on surveys and the benefits to bringing this group to our way of seeing sites.  Using public programs run at James Madison’s Montpelier as an example, the methods of incorporating metal detectorists into surveys will be presented.  Key to these programs is using and presenting metal detectors as a remote sensing device—a concept with not only practical benefits for finding sites, but is an extremely powerful tool to present the value of site preservation to a group that traditionally views sites solely from an artifact-centered approach.

This course will be of interest to archaeologists who run field programs and have a need to find and define historic sites (phase I and II surveys).  This includes contract firms, university researchers, historic property managers, cultural resource managers for large land holdings (state and federal).

Objectives

The goals of this one hour, online seminar are to discuss the practical and conceptual benefits of working with the metal detecting community.  The practical include the use of metal detectorists in efficiently locating sites, obtaining site information from folks that have metal detected in areas, and using the local metal detecting community to spread the word about site protection of a particular area or set of sites.  The conceptual include engaging a constituency that is an easy and useful target for understanding the benefits of site preservation.

After taking the online seminar, participants will: 1) Understand the benefits of metal detector survey using experienced detectorists; 2) know how to practically engage with metal detectorists; and 3) will know the pros and cons of such interactions.

Instructor

 Dr. Matthew Reeves has been the Director of Archaeology at James Madison’s Montpelier since 2000. The projects he had developed at Montpelier include the archaeological research and restoration of the mansion grounds, most especially the homes of the enslaved community at Montpelier.  He is responsible for ensuring that the well-preserved archaeological complex at Montpelier not only is tapped for an accurate restoration of the Madison-era landscape, but also that is it preserved for future generations.Matt has a deep interest in community-based archaeology--and this ranges from working with descendant communities, metal detectorists, and the public in general.  The week-long experiential programs he has established at Montpelier are a prime example of public engagement and how archaeology can be a transformative study of the past.  

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members
Not available to individual SAA nonmembers

 

 Using R Statistical Computing Language for Archaeological Analysis

Date/Time

September 27, 2016   2:00-4:00 p.m. EST  Sold Out!

Description

The goal of this 2- hour online seminar is to introduce archaeologists to the benefits of using the statistical coding language R in various levels of field work and analysis.  R is a very powerful free, open-source, and extensible coding language that has gained tremendous popularity in many scientific and humanities fields.  This seminar will focus on introducing the capabilities of R, a brief run through the language syntax and conventions, provide an over view of the available packages, and review a number of real world applications.  This seminar is intended for at least three different audiences:  1) students looking to get some insight into new techniques to help their research; 2) professionals who are new to coding, but want to see what it has to offer their work; and 3) those with some coding experience who want to see the benefits of a new language or new examples in a language in which they are familiar.

Objectives

 Participants will learn about 1) the benefits of using computer code to achieve more efficient, repeatable, and open archaeological analysis; 2) the very basics of how to install R and get working on their own data; and 3) the great depth of analysis they can pursue as demonstrated through real world examples.

Instructor

Matthew Harris M.A., RPA is a Sr. Archaeologist and Manager of GIS and Digital Media in the Cultural Resources Department at AECOM, Burlington, New Jersey.  He has 16 years of experience applying technological solutions for cultural resources problems of all scales and complexity.  Work experience in the Pennsylvania SHPO, private sector cultural resource management firms, and academia has led to Mr. Harris developing a multi-perspective approach to implementing technology where one size does not fit all. He specializes in data management work flows for large projects, spatial analysis, and statistical modeling.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $139 individual non-SAA member, $139 group rate, SAA members/$159 group rate, non-SAA members.

Interacting with the Media: Strategies for Pitching and Interviewing

Date/Time

September 22, 2016  3:00-4:00 p.m. EST SOLD OUT!

Description

The overall goal of this one-hour online seminar is to increase participant’s confidence in and understanding of, interactions with the media. It will be relevant and helpful to archaeologists working in a variety of settings.

Objectives

 Objectives for the course are to enable participants to:

a. Identify and craft a strong, newsworthy story for the media—the key elements of a good story and what the media is looking for.

b. Participate in a media interview confidently-understanding how to stay in control of the interview, get your key message across and know what to do and what not to do in various types of media interviews.

c. Understand how the media can be used for archaeological advocacy

Instructor

Amanda Karfakis is president/CEO of Vitamin, the Cure of the Common Brand, the first boutique agency in the mid-Atlantic to integrate print, web-design and public relations under one roof. With more than 15 years of experience in strategic marketing-communications, Amanda is responsible for steering Vitamin’s strategic direction, as well as managing the firm’s PR department. A Towson University graduate, she is an active supporter of the marketing industry and the Baltimore community. She currently serves on SMPS’s national   technology committee and holds a board seat with the American Diabetes Association's Maryland chapter. Follow Amanda on Twitter @Amanda_Karfakis.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

Fundamentals of Budgeting for Archaeological Projects

Date/Time

May 24, 2016   2:00-4:00 p.m. EDT Sold Out!

Description

This course will focus on the fundamentals of budgeting for an archaeology project. It will examine how budgets are developed for different kinds of contracts and for various types of archaeology projects.  Practical examples will be given to highlight the concepts taught, and common budgeting pitfalls will be identified. The course is appropriate for recent college graduates, graduate students, and junior-level archaeological staff members.

Objectives

 The seminar will introduce participants to the basic principles underlying budgeting for an archaeology project.  Although presented from a CRM perspective, the concepts introduced are also applicable to budgeting for grants. After participating in the online seminar, attendees will be able to:  1) Calculate overhead/indirect project costs.  2) Estimate labor costs. And 3) Estimate direct project costs.

Instructor

Susan M. Chandler is a Registered Professional Archaeologist with 37 years of experience on prehistoric and historic investigations in the western United States.  Until her retirement in 2013, Ms. Chandler was President of Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc., a CRM firm in Colorado that she founded in 1987. 

As President of Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Ms. Chandler was in charge of overall company management. She monitored general operating costs, enforced company policies and procedures, and oversaw the planning, implementation, coordination, and monitoring of all projects.  She negotiated all contract budgets and tracked project hours and direct expenses to stay within established schedules and budgets. 

Ms. Chandler is Past-President of the Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists and the American Cultural Resources Association.  She served as Treasurer for the Society for American Archaeology and serves on the SAA Investment and Finance Committee.  She is the current SAA President Elect.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $139 individual non-SAA member, $139 group rate, SAA members/$159 group rate, non-SAA members.

Yes you CAN do that! Creative Mitigation and Section 106 Undertakings

Date/Time

March 30, 2016, 2:00-4:00  EST. Sold Out!

Description

This two-hour online seminar is designed for current and potential future cultural resource managers, private sector cultural resource firms, and agency personnel.  The goals of the online seminar are:

 a. To encourage current and potential future cultural resource managers, consultants, and regulators to think outside the box that currently constitutes standard practice for mitigating adverse effects to historic properties as a result of development activities.

b. To explore good examples of more creative approaches to mitigation.

c. To provide guidance on what constitutes appropriate creative approaches.

Objectives

Participants will learn:

a. That the Section 106 process, as defined in regulation, allows great flexibility in designing the measures to mitigate adverse effects on historic properties.

b. That the determining factors in designing good, creative mitigation are:  the needs of the affected resources, the needs of the undertaking, and the relative public benefits.

c. That creative mitigation need not be more costly, more time-consuming, or more complicated than “business as usual,” and indeed may be less costly, time-consuming, and/or complicated.

Instructors

Lynne Sebastian Ph.D., RPA and Terry Klein M.A., RPA, have a combined total of nearly 70 years working in the field of cultural resource management. They have experience as CRM consultants, in a State Historic Preservation Office, in a federal agency, and since 2002 have been principals in a nonprofit foundation with a historic preservation mission.  They have developed and taught courses on Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, and Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act.   They have taught these classes for State Departments of Transportation, various federal land-managing agencies, Indian tribes, private sector consulting firms, development industries, and the universities of New Mexico and Maryland.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $139 individual non-SAA member, $139 group rate, SAA members/$159 group rate, non-SAA members.

 

Archaeological Applications of Airborne Laser Scanning

Date/Time

March 2, 2016, 2:00-4:00 EST. Sold Out!

Description

 Airborne Laser scanning (ALS, also known as lidar or LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology used to create detailed and accurate 3D models of the earth’s surface and objects on it over extensive areas.  This two-hour online seminar aims to promote the use of ALS within archaeology by providing an overview of the technology, its potential applications in research and management, and examples of successful projects.

Objectives

1. Assess the quality of raw ALS data and its appropriateness for their project.

2. Visually interpret ALS based terrain models and point clouds.

3. Critique or develop a proposal that includes ALS as part of a broader research or heritage management project.

Instructor

Dr. Rachel Optiz, RPA, received her PhD in Archaeology from the University of Cambridge in 2009. Her doctoral project was one of the first to use airborne laser scanning to study archaeological landscapes.  She is currently chief topographer for the Gabii Project (Kelsey Museum, University of Michigan) and is using photogrammetry to document the excavations, making detailed 3D models of the site as it is being uncovered in order to help excavators understand the complex stratigraphy and inter-relating structures.

Pricing

 $99 individual SAA member/ $139 individual non-SAA member, $139 group rate, SAA members/$159 group rate, non-SAA members.

Advanced Archaeological Digital Data Management

Date/Time

February 25, 2016, 2:00-4:00 EST Sold Out!

Description

 Archaeology relies heavily on digital data: photographs taken in the field, GIS information, analytical and descriptive data sets, project reports, etc. Without a well thought-out approach to data management, important information will be overlooked or lost because it is forgotten, misplaced or damaged. Good digital data management requires attention to the means of data storage, aspects of archiving data, how data are to be preserved, and the curation of data so that is discoverable, accessible and usable. This two-hour online seminar will explore the practical aspects of good data management: how to organize materials during the life of a project, tools and methods that they can integrate into their existing projects and workflows to ensure data is prepared preservation and accessibility once a project is complete. The course can be taken as a follow up from the Introduction to Archaeological Digital Data Management or can be taken as a standalone course. The intended seminar audience includes archaeological project managers, PIs, curators and researchers.  Archaeologists working in CRM, government agency, and academic portions of the profession will find the information provided relevant and of use in their day-to-day and longer-term professional activities.  Any archaeologist or related professional who works with digital archaeological information will benefit from the course.

Objectives

The objectives for the course are to enable participants to: 1) identify good digital data management practice as it relates to the topics of data storage, data archiving, long-term preservation, and the access and reuse of digital data; 2) organize their digital materials during the life of a project and prepare them for curation and preservation; 3) produce a data management plan for a current or future projects.

Instructor

Francis P. McManamon is the Executive Director of Digital Antiquity. Issues and topics related to the management of archaeological data and information is one of his professional focuses. Digital Antiquity develops and maintains tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record), an international repository for data and documents related to archaeology and archaeological investigations.

Pricing

 $99 individual SAA member/ $139 individual non-SAA member, $139 group rate, SAA members/$159 group rate, non-SAA members.

Strengthening Your Academic CV

Date/Time

Tuesday, January 26, 2016, 3:00-4:00 EST. SOLD OUT!

Description

This one-hour, online seminar is intended for graduate students who are approaching completion of their degrees and recent graduates with at least an MA in anthropology and archaeology who are seeking employment in the academic sector. The course goal is to guide participants in creating, formatting, and updating their CV for seeking an academic position.

Objectives

 After completing the course participants will be able to:  1) Format their CV to highlight the most important information and meet professional standards;  2) Edit their CV over time; and 3) Avoid “red flags” in their CV when used for academic job hunting.

Instructor

Dr. Janet Levy has taught at UNC Charlotte since 1980 and served 7 ½ years as chair of the Dept. of Anthropology.  Under her leadership, the department started an M.A. program in Anthropology.   During her years as a faculty member, she participated in hiring for at least 20 tenure-line faculty positions.  She served as Secretary of SAA during 2011-2013, and served as coordinator for the CV workshops held at several annual meetings.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

 

Geophysical Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Overview and Practical Guide for Beginners and Intermediate Users, Teachers, and Consumers

 Date/Time

December 3, 2015, 2:00-4:00 EST. Sold Out !!!

Description

 Geophysics is finally starting to take hold in American archaeology, but there are very few opportunities for good training on how to operate the instruments, process the data, and interpret the results. The primary goal of this seminar is to provide a basic introduction to the fundamental principles of making geophysics work for archaeologists.  We will focus on several basic components of good practice, including choosing an instrument, setting up a survey, collecting good data, basic data processing, and most important of all—data interpretation. A wide variety of examples and case studies will be used from all across the US, with an emphasis on the three instrument types commonly used in American archaeology: magnetometers, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance meters. Doing good geophysics in archaeology is not about how many different instruments you can throw at a site, it’s about objectives and what you hope to achieve. So, it’s time to dust off that magnetometer that’s been sitting in the closet, charge up your geology colleague’s radar, and get yourself out in the field to collect some data!

Objectives

After completing this course participants will have a basic understanding of how to (1) collect, (2) process, and (3) interpret geophysical data from the three main instruments used by archaeologists: magnetometers, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance meters. An emphasis will be placed on doing this with an archaeologist’s eye to understanding the archaeological record.

Instructor

Jarrod Burks, Ph.D.is the Director of Archaeological Geophysics at Ohio Valley Archaeology, Inc. He has been conducting geophysical surveys on archaeology sites since 1998 in a wide variety of survey settings in terms of geology/soils and archaeological targets.  He has published his research national and international journals including American Antiquity, Archaeological Prospection, and the Journal of Archaeological Science.  For the past two decades he has been an  instructor at the National Park Service’s geophysics workshop for archaeology, hosted annually by the Midwest Archeological Center at a wide range of venues around the country.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

 

Archaeological Curation for the 21st Century

Date/Time

November 17, 2015, 2:00-4:00 EDT. Sold Out!

Description

This online webinar will:   (a) Provide a historical perspective on the curation crisis in Archaeology:  (b) Provide participants with a strong understanding of the entire process of archaeology, from pre-‐field planning through curation and: (c) Offer solutions and resources that can be used in daily tasks associated with development and maintenance of sound archaeological collections stewardship.

Objectives

After participating in the online seminar, attendees will: (1) Develop a strong understanding of the curation crisis in American archaeology, from both historical and current perspectives and use this information to inform their future decision-making processes. (2) Understand the responsibilities that archaeologists have to the collections they generate, be conversant in the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Federal Curation Regulations, 36 CFR 79, and utilize this information when making choices about curation. (3) Apply the concepts to address issues of curation in their work places.

Instructors

Danielle Benden is the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin--‐Madison. In addition to managing and providing access to the anthropological collections, she teaches Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses to undergraduates, and conducts her own archaeological research currently in southwestern Wisconsin. She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin--‐La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an Archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado--‐Boulder. 

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.
$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

Introduction to Digital Repositories for Archaeological Materials: tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record)

Date/Time

September  28, 2015, 2:00-3:00 EDT Sold Out!

Description

This seminar will introduce participants to the types of digital repositories that are available and where they can browse, access and download archaeological documents, data sets, images and other kinds of archaeological information. Archaeologists, whether they work in CRM, for government agencies, or in academic positions, can use digital repositories to store, organize and promote their archaeological work. Using tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record) as a case study, participants will learn how to access and use resources in the repository and curate and manage CRM reports, data sets, photographs, GIS files and other archaeologically relevant digital resources.

Objectives

Participants will learn about several of the different digital repositories that are available, how to enhance their research by searching for archaeological “grey literature” online, including documents, data sets, images, and other supplementary information that supports published reports and manuscripts. They will also learn how to use the tDAR digital repository to store, edit, manage and preserve their digital archaeological files and projects. This will include how to use the different features and tools in tDAR to actively curate their data, for example, by controlling access permissions to confidential archaeological information.

Instructors

Dr. Jodi Reeves Flores, RPA and Leigh Anne Ellison, RPA, Center for Digital Antiquity.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

Advocacy 101 for Archaeologists: developing your toolkit during the crisis and the calm

 

Date/Time

Tuesday, May 12, 2015 EDT, 3:00-4:00 P.M. Sold Out!

Description

This one-hour online seminar offers resources and support for archaeologists who want to advocate for archaeological resources. After participating in the course, participants will be able to develop an advocacy plan to address a current or potential crisis.

Objectives

Objectives for the course are to enable participants to: Identify federal, state, and local laws that protect archaeological sites; craft personal statements for the benefit  of historical resources; address ethical conflicts that arise between archaeologists and those digging artifacts for personal gain; discuss affordances and constraints of partnering with collectors; and locate resources that highlight the economic and civic benefits of archaeology

Instructor

Sarah E. Miller MA, RPA is the director of the Northeast and east Central regions of the Florida Public Archaeology Network. She is responsible for establishing a base of those interested in protecting archaeological resources, in fostering their interest, and in engaging them in activities that help preserve the archaeological record. An effective advocate for site preservation, Miller developed the workshop Archaeology Advocacy; Beyond Indiana Jones  for public audiences that have included city and county preservation staff, academics, avocational archaeologists, law enforcement, museums and other professional societies. She is the current chair of the Society for Historical Archaeology Public Education and Interpretation Committee, and a contributor to the recent volume Archaeologists as Activists.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

AMS Radiocarbon Dating: Expectations & Essentials for Sample Selection and Calibration 

Date/Time

May 5, 2015, 2:00-4:00 EDT. Sold Out!!!

Description

 The objective of AMS radiocarbon dating varies by project. At its most basic, AMS radiocarbon dating provides reference points to understand the chronology of past occupations or events. It may also be used to identify separate occupations, refine chronologies, and identify when individuals (humans or animals) lived. Understanding what constitutes an ideal sample and what can be dated is critical for archaeologists, particularly when it relates to life span of the material being dated. Life span of trees may exceed centuries, introducing another element of uncertainty to the date calibration.

Objectives

Participants will complete the online seminar with an understanding of what to select for dating, field methods, and AMS calibration. In addition they will be able to select something appropriate to date with confidence and prepare an appropriate sampling kit for the field.

Instructor

Linda Scott-Cummings started PaleoResearch institute 42 years ago to provide comprehensive archaeobotany studies. In addition to holding a Ph.D. in Anthropology, with a specialty is archaeobotany, she has been doing lab processing and interpreting the result of AMS radiocarbon dates for more than a decade.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

 

Fundamentals of Budgeting for Archaeology Projects

Date/Time

Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 1:00 - 3:00 PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

 This course will focus on the fundamentals of budgeting for an archaeology project, drawing on the instructor’s 30+ years of experience in creating budgets for cultural resource management projects.  It will examine how budgets are developed for different kinds of contracts and for various types of archaeology projects.  Practical examples will be given to highlight the concepts taught, and common budgeting pitfalls will be identified. The course is appropriate for recent college graduates, graduate students, and junior-level archaeological staff members.

Objectives

The seminar will introduce participants to the basic principles underlying budgeting for an archaeology project.  Although presented from a CRM perspective, the concepts introduced are also applicable to budgeting for grants. After participating in the online seminar, attendees will be able to:  1) Calculate overhead/indirect project costs.  2) Estimate labor costs. And 3) Estimate direct project costs.

Instructor

Susan M. Chandler is a Registered Professional Archaeologist with 37 years of experience on prehistoric and historic investigations in the western United States.  Until her retirement in 2013, Ms Chandler was President of Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc., a CRM firm in Colorado that she founded in 1987. 

As President of Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Ms. Chandler was in charge of overall company management. She monitored general operating costs, enforced company policies and procedures, and oversaw the planning, implementation, coordination, and monitoring of all projects.  She negotiated all contract budgets and tracked project hours and direct expenses to stay within established schedules and budgets. 

Ms. Chandler is Past-President of the Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists and the American Cultural Resources Association.  She served as Treasurer for the Society for American Archaeology and serves on the SAA Investment and Finance Committee.  She is the current SAA Liaison to the RPA.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

Publishing Your First Article in American Antiquity

Date/Time

Friday, March 13, 2015, 3:00-4:00 PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This one-hour seminar offers a concise primer on the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript to American Antiquity.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to determine if their work is suited for publication in American Antiquity; they will understand the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript; and they will take away tips for effective manuscript revision. The intended audience is first-time contributors to American Antiquity, including graduate students.

Instructor

Dr. Kenneth Sassaman is the sitting Editor of American Antiquity, with 30+ years of experience in the profession, including abundant publishing experience.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

Introduction to Archaeological Digital Data Management

Date/Time

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:00 – 2:00 PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This online seminar will introduce participants to the background of archaeological data management, how good data management is organized, and tools and methods that they can integrate into their existing project and research workflows to ensure good management of digital data.

Objectives

After the seminar participants will be able to: 1) identify good digital data management practice as it relates to the topics of data storage, data archiving, long-term preservation, and the access and reuse of digital data; 2) produce a data management plan for a current or future projects; and 3) be able to identify and use the many tools, applications, and websites available to help manage and curate digital archaeological data.

Instructors

Francis P. McManamon, RPA, is the Executive Director of Digital Antiquity. Issues and topics related to the management of archaeological data and information is one of his professional focuses. Digital Antiquity develops and maintains tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record), an international repository for data and documents related to archaeology and archaeological investigations.

Jodi Reeves Flores is a Digital Curator and the CLIR/DLF Fellow in Data Curation for the Sciences and Social Sciences at Arizona State University Libraries and the Center for Digital Antiquity (Digital Antiquity).

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

Funding Opportunites from the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research

 

Date/Time

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 3:00-4:00 EST. Sold Out!

Description

 This online seminar will provide an introduction to the Wenner-Gren Foundation, its unique history and its role in funding international anthropology, including archaeology. The goals of the seminar are to 1) to share the unique history of the Wenner-Gren Foundation and its role in the development of international anthropology; 2) to introduce doctoral students and senior scholars to the variety of funding opportunities available through the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and 3) to explain how archaeologists can prepare a competitive grant application for the most popular Wenner-Gren research grant programs (the Dissertation Fieldwork Grant and the Post-Ph.D. Research Grant).

Objectives

 Participants will come away with an understanding of the funding opportunities available from Wenner-Gren Foundation, and how to write a successful Wenner-Gren grant application (particularly important in view of the fact that the Foundation’s success rate is only 15%). Attendees will have the opportunity to ask specific questions about the Wenner-Gren Foundation and all aspects of the application, review and award process.

Instructor

Leslie Aiello is the President of the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the largest private foundation devoted to the support of international anthropological research. She has been in this position since 2005, during which time the Foundation has received over 13,000 applications and made 2,126 awards. She is personally involved in the decision for each application as well as in all aspects of program design and implementation. Dr. Aiello’s academic interests focus on the evolution of human adaptation as well as on the broader issues of evolutionary theory, life history and the evolution of the brain and cognition. She received her BA and MA in Anthropology from the University of California (Los Angeles) and her PhD in human evolution and anatomy from the University of London.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

 

The Conservation and Management of Rock Art: An Integrated Approach

Date/Time

Thursday,  January 22, 2015,  2:00-4:00PM EST. 

Description

 Compared to the attention that archaeologists have given to conventional archaeological features and artifacts that are partly or fully buried within deposits , exposed rock art surfaces that contain petroglyphs and pictographs have paradoxically been overlooked and so many have accordingly suffered from neglect. This course shows that being fixed in place, rock art sites contain unique features that allow us to understand the past and the ongoing significance of these enduring places,  which along with indigenous significance and general public interest , are sufficient reason for their appropriate study, management,  and conservation.

Objectives

The online seminar will introduce archaeologists to basic principles and procedures regarding rock art conservation and management.  Participants will come away understanding:  1) Rock art conservation decisions are intricately tied to site variables,  various significance values, the input of stakeholders and how sites are represented to the public.  2) The unique ways in which location, history, significance values, condition, management context, stakeholders, and site preservation determine how a site is best managed and conserved.  3) Knowledge of the rock surface has shown that a number of pre-conceptions concerning rock weathering are flawed.

Instructor

Johannes Loubser is a Research Associate at the University of Witwatersrand’s Rock Art Research Institute and the Lamar Institute in Georgia. He has worked at rock art sites in various regions of the U.S. and Canada, the Caribbean Islands, Mexico, Bolivia, and the Hawaiian archipelago. Loubser  has written book chapters and lectured extensively on rock art site management and conservation.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

Archaeology & Social Media: A Primer for Those Who Aren't Sure They Want It or Need It

Date/Time

December 10, 2014 , 2:00-3:00PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This one-hour online seminar will provide archaeologists with  a basic undersanding of different forms of social media, and how they can be used to professionally benefit an individual or program. It will also address the ethical issues of social media regarding site protection and preservation. 

Objectives

Participants will come away with an understanding of: 1) The range of social media available, what they do, and how to use them; 2) How to develop a social media strategy and social media policy and 3) The constraints and limitations that social media have for archaeology, including copyright and ownership issues, site protection issues, and different audiences. 

Instructor

Lynne Goldstein has been a Professor of Anthropology at Michigan State University since 1996. She learned the benefits and limitations of using social media in archaeology when she launched the Campus Archaeology Program at MSU. Her experiences taught her that effective social media can save time, increase visibility and yield other positive results, in addition to maximizing limited program resources. In 2012 Goldstein received an AT&T Instructional Technology Award for use and integration of social media into teaching an on-campus field school. 

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

 

An Introduction to the Section 106 Process

Date/Time

December 2, 2014 , 1:00-3:00PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This two-hour online seminar is intended for archaeologists who want an initial understanding of the Section 106 process

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to outline the basic Section 106 process, identify the participants involved in the process, and summarize its procedures following 36CFR800. In addition students will know the basic provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act.

Instructor

Thomas Green is an independent teacher, scholar, and consultant regarding cultural resource management and former director of the Arkansas Archaeological Survey.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA members/$129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

 

Proposal Writing in Cultural Resource Management

Date/Time

November 18, 2014, 9:00 – 11:00 AM EST. Sold Out

Description

The seminar will provide an overview of the proposal-writing process in CRM.  The focus will be on competitive proposals for government clients, but many of the lessons will have cross-application to private-sector work.  The course will emphasize the importance of carefully evaluating each opportunity and developing an appropriate Go/No Go process.  This will include detailed advice on reading an RFP.  The course will stress that you have to have an angle, if you hope to have a winning proposal, and that your proposal must be properly designed to highlight your strengths.  The seminar will discuss in detail the difference between generic claims and actual proofs.  The course examples will be drawn from Espenshade’s experience, and will cover the Midwest, Northeast, MidAtlantic, Southeast, and Caribbean.   

Objectives

The goals of the seminar are: 1) to educate (or refresh) the students on the different factors that lead to a successful proposal; 2) to better organize or regiment the proposal-writing process; and 3) to provide the tools by which the participants can increase their return from their proposal efforts. 

Participants will come from this online seminar with an understanding that 1) not every firm should be chasing every opportunity.  Each firm should have a well-defined Go/NoGo process;  2) that the proposal-writer must know what gives their firm a good chance of winning the job before they begin writing a proposal; and 3) proposals should be focused on providing proofs. 

Instructor

Chris Espenshade is a Registered Professional Archaeologist with more than 28 years of supervisory experience in cultural resource management (CRM).  He holds an MA in anthropology from the University of Florida and a BA in anthropology from Wake Forest University.  Chris has worked for a number of major CRM and engineering firms, including: New South Associates; Skelly and Loy; Garrow & Associates/TRC Associates; and Brockington and Associates.  Chris currently serves as the Regional Director in CCRG’s Jackson, Michigan office.  He had proposal-writing duties at all of these firms, and wrote successful competitive proposals for a full range of federal, state, and private-sector clients. 

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

 

New Developments in Technologies for the Measurement of Form and Space in Archaeology: An Introduction for Students

Date/Time
November 6, 2014, 2:00-4:00 PM EST. Sold Out

Description

Exactly 60 years ago Gordon Willey famously stated that the objectives of archaeology are “approached by the study and manipulation of three basic factors: form, space and time.” Since then we have seen the huge impact that improved technologies for the measurement of time have had on the field. We are currently in the midst of a similar revolution in the methods for the measurement of space and form. The workshop is designed as an introduction to these developments - providing an accessible review of the characteristics and uses of such methods as high-resolution GNSS, “laser scanning,” close range photogrammetry and related methods for the measurement of space and form of landscapes, sites, structures and objects.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to (a) assess the capabilities of different strategies, (b) the costs and benefits of the various technologies,  and (c) assess whether they may be of value to their projects.  They will be able to characterize the basic differences in the technologies and how they may be applied in archaeological and heritage contexts.

 

Instructors

Fred Limp has been involved in the application of geomatics methods to archaeology for more than three decades. He was the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies for 18 years. He has served as PI or Co-PI on four major NSF projects applying geomatics to archaeology and heritage management and in 2013 he was appointed by Interior Secretary Salazar to the Board of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training.  He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate and short courses on the topic. He is also a past president of the SAA.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

 

Introduction to Teaching Forensic Archaeology

Date/Time

October 29, 2014, 2:00-4:00 PM EDT. Sold Out

Description

This online seminar in Forensic Archaeology provides a basic introduction to the benefits and the problems encountered in applying archaeological field recovery and analytical techniques in forensic science contexts. Participants who are or anticipate becoming college professors may choose to use the seminar as the first step in the development of an undergraduate course in forensic archaeology. The seminar explores positive contributions that traditional archaeological strategies, tactics, and techniques can make to forensic science.

Objectives

The primary goal of the online seminar is to introduce participants to the special problems encountered in the application of archaeological techniques to crime, accident, or disaster scene investigations. The focus is on ways in which archaeology can contribute to forensic science but with emphasis on the adaptations that must be made to standard archaeological techniques to make them useful in that context. The seminar will be helpful to archaeologists considering the development of an undergraduate course of study in archaeological science as a contributing course in a broader forensic science curriculum.

Instructor

Dean Snow has fifty years of experience in archaeological research and in the teaching of archaeology. He is a past president of the Society for American Archaeology. In 2006, Snow developed a course in Forensic Archaeology (427W) for the Department of Anthropology and the then new program in Forensic Science at The Pennsylvania State University, which he taught for seven years.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

 

The National Science Foundation Archaeology Program: Insight into the Grant Application and Award Process

 

Date/Time

October 9, 2014, 3:00-4:00 EDT. Sold Out

Description

 This one-hour online seminar is designed for graduate students as well as more senior researchers--both archaeologists and individuals in related disciplines--who might consider submitting proposals to the NSF Archaeology Program or other relevant NSF competitions. The central goal of the seminar is to explain to potential applicants how the Archaeology Program at NSF is organized and functions. The grant application process will be explained and the characteristics of successful proposals described. Advice will be provided and specific questions answered through question and answer interaction.

Objectives

Participants in the online seminar will: 1) Gain sufficient knowledge regarding the Archaeology Program’s goals, individual competitions, potential and limitations to determine whether it would make sense to consider an application submission: 2) Receive advice on proposal writing and insight into how proposals are evaluated, and receive useful information for crafting a successful application: and 3) Have the opportunity to ask, and receive answers to specific questions they may have. These likely will be of broader general interest.

Instructor

John Yellen directs the Archaeology Program at NSF and thus has unique insight into how it functions. As an employee of NSF for many years he also has knowledge of other archaeologically-relevant competitions.

Pricing

Free to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members.

 

Archaeological Curation for the 21st Century

 

Date/Time
Tuesday, September 30, 2014. Time: 1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT. Sold Out!

Description

This online webinar will:   (a) Provide a historical perspective on the curation crisis in Archaeology:  (b) Provide participants with a strong understanding of the entire process of archaeology, from pre-‐field planning through curation and: (c) Offer solutions and resources that can be used in daily tasks associated with development and maintenance of sound archaeological collections stewardship.

Objectives

After participating in the online seminar, attendees will: (1) Develop a strong understanding of the curation crisis in American archaeology, from both historical and current perspectives and use this information to inform their future decision-making processes. (2) Understand the responsibilities that archaeologists have to the collections they generate, be conversant in the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Federal Curation Regulations, 36 CFR 79, and utilize this information when making choices about curation. (3) Apply the concepts to address issues of curation in their work places.

Instructor

Danielle Benden is the Senior Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin--‐Madison. In addition to managing and providing access to the anthropological collections, she teaches Archaeological Curation and Field Methods courses to undergraduates, and conducts her own archaeological research currently in southwestern Wisconsin. She received a Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin--‐La Crosse and a Master of Science in Museum and Field Studies with an Archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado--‐Boulder. 

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member.

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members.

Archaeo-politics-making archaeology matter to policymakers

Date/Time
Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Time: 1:00 PM–2:00 PM EST. Sold Out

Description

Creating and maintaining good relationships with legislative and regulatory offices is critical to communicating the importance of the archaeological record to our stakeholders. This online webinar will provide background knowledge and strategies necessary to accomplish this.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will understand: 1) The scope of government involvement in archaeology; 2) Why policymakers need to be kept actively apprised of developments in the science and of issues affecting the discipline; and 3)  how to talk to Members of Congress and agency personnel, in order to get your message across.

Instructor

David Lindsay has served for twelve years as the SAA’s Manager of Government Affairs. His previous work experience included lobbying for an agriculture trade association and six years serving as a staff person on Capitol Hill for three Members of Congress.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

Introduction to Archaeological Damage Assessment

Date/Time
Tuesday, March 4, 2014. Time: 3:00 PM–5:00 PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This seminar will provide participants with an introduction to the processes, procedures, and legal requirements for archaeological damage assessment.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will understand what archaeological damage assessment is and the legal basis for it, they will understand the procedures involved in archaeological damage assessment, and they will understand the professional qualifications necessary to conduct archaeological damage assessments and the legal standards for providing expert witness testimony.

Instructor

Martin E. McAllister, RPA, formed the company now known as Archaeological Damage Assessment & Investigation that specializes in consulting and training on archaeological damage assessment and the investigation and prosecution of archaeological violations. He is the author of National Park Service Technical Brief 20 entitled Archeological Resource Damage Assessment: Legal Basis and Methods.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

Introduction to Digital Repositories for Archaeological Materials: tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record)

Date/Time
Thursday, March 13, 2014. Time: 2:00 PM–3:00 PM EST. Sold Out

Description

This seminar will introduce participants to the types of digital repositories that are available and where they can browse, access and download archaeological documents, data sets, images and other kinds of archaeological information. Archaeologists, whether they work in CRM, for government agencies, or in academic positions, can use digital repositories to store, organize and promote their archaeological work. Using tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record) as a case study, participants will learn how to access and use resources in the repository and curate and manage CRM reports, data sets, photographs, GIS files and other archaeologically relevant digital resources.

Objectives

Participants will learn about several of the different digital repositories that are available, how to enhance their research by searching for archaeological “grey literature” online, including documents, data sets, images, and other supplementary information that supports published reports and manuscripts. They will also learn how to use the tDAR digital repository to store, edit, manage and preserve their digital archaeological files and projects. This will include how to use the different features and tools in tDAR to actively curate their data, for example, by controlling access permissions to confidential archaeological information.

Instructors

Dr. Jodi Reeves Flores, RPA and Leigh Anne Ellison, RPA, Center for Digital Antiquity.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

Introduction to Archaeological Digital Data Management

Date/Time
Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Time: 2:00 PM–4:00 PM EST. Sold Out!

Description

This online seminar will introduce participants to the background of archaeological data management, how good data management is organized, and tools and methods that they can integrate into their existing project and research workflows to ensure good management of digital data..

Objectives

After the seminar participants will be able to: 1) identify good digital data management practice as it relates to the topics of data storage, data archiving, long-term preservation, and the access and reuse of digital data; 2) produce a data management plan for a current or future projects; and 3) be able to identify and use the many tools, applications, and websites available to help manage and curate digital archaeological data.

Instructors

Francis P. McManamon, RPA, is the Executive Director of Digital Antiquity. Issues and topics related to the management of archaeological data and information is one of his professional focuses. Digital Antiquity develops and maintains tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record), an international repository for data and documents related to archaeology and archaeological investigations.

Jodi Reeves Flores is a Digital Curator and the CLIR/DLF Fellow in Data Curation for the Sciences and Social Sciences at Arizona State University Libraries and the Center for Digital Antiquity (Digital Antiquity).

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

Publishing Your First Article in American Antiquity

Date/Time
Friday, February 21, 2014. Time: 2:00 PM–4:00 PM EST, Sold Out! 

Description

This one-hour seminar offers a concise primer on the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript to American Antiquity.

Objectives

After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to determine if their work is suited for publication in American Antiquity; they will understand the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript; and they will take away tips for effective manuscript revision. The intended audience is first-time contributors to American Antiquity, including graduate students.

Instructor

Dr. Kenneth Sassaman is the sitting Editor of American Antiquity, with 30+ years of experience in the profession, including abundant publishing experience.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

An Introduction to the Section 106 Process

Date/Time
January 28, 2014. Time: 12:00 noon-2:00 PM EST, Sold Out!

Description

The two-hour online seminar is intended for archaeologists who want an initial understanding of the Section 106 process.

Objectives

Participants will be able to outline the basic Section 106 process, identify the participants involved in the process, and summarize its procedures following 36CFR800. In addition, the student will know the basic provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act.

Instructor

Thomas Green, RPA, is an independent teacher, scholar, and consultant regarding cultural resource management and former director of the Arkansas Archaeological Survey.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

New Developments in Technologies for the Measurement of Form and Space in Archaeology: An Introduction for Students

Date/Time
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM– 12:00 noon EST, Sold Out!

Description

Participants (particularly students) will learn the characteristics and archaeological and heritage management uses of new technologies and methods in high precision survey methods (typically sub-millimeter to centimeter) using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and “laser scanning” (and other related technologies such as close range photogrammetry and structure light measurement systems) for landscapes, sites, structures and objects..

Objectives

Participants will be able to assess the capabilities of different strategies, assess the costs and benefits of the various technologies, and assess whether they may be of value to their projects. They will be able to characterize the basic differences in the technologies and how they may be applied in archaeological and heritage contexts.

Instructor

Fred Limp has been involved in the application of geomatics methods to archaeology for more than three decades. He was the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies for 18 years. He has served as PI or Co-PI on four major NSF projects applying geomatics to archaeology and heritage management and in 2013 he was appointed by Interior Secretary Salazar to the Board of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate and short courses on the topic.

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

Public Archaeology is a Moving Target

Date/Time
November 14, 2013, 3:00 PM EDT-5:00 PM, Sold Out!

Description

This seminar is designed to give an overview of public archaeology as it is practiced in the United States today.

Objectives

Attendees will come away with an understanding of three main categories of public archaeology: (1) cultural resource management (CRM) or cultural heritage management (CHM) under public law; (2) outreach and education with the intention to prevent looting and vandalism of archaeological places and to combat the illicit international trade in antiquities; and (3) archaeology that aims to help communities or individuals in some way or to solve societal problems.

Instructor

Dr. Barbara J. Little, RPA, works on public archaeology issues of public outreach and involvement, evaluation and official designations of archaeological places, and on the public relevance of archaeology and cultural heritage. She is the Program Manager for the Cultural Resources Office of Outreach for the U.S. National Park Service in Washington, DC and Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members

 

Archaeological Applications of Airborne Laser Scanning

Date/Time

September 17, 2013, 11:00AM EDT-1:00PM, Sold Out!

Description

Airborne Laser scanning (ALS, also known as lidar or LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology used to create detailed and accurate 3D models of the earth’s surface and objects on it over extensive areas.  This two-hour online seminar aims to promote the use of ALS within archaeology by providing an overview of the technology, its potential applications in research and management, and examples of successful projects.

Objectives

1. Assess the quality of raw ALS data and its appropriateness for their project.

2. Visually interpret ALS based terrain models and point clouds.

3. Critique or develop a proposal that includes ALS as part of a broader research or heritage management project.

Instructor

Dr. Rachel Optiz, RPA, received her PhD in Archaeology from the University of Cambridge in 2009. Her doctoral project was one of the first to use airborne laser scanning to study archaeological landscapes.  She is currently chief topographer for the Gabii Project (Kelsey Museum, University of Michigan) and is using photogrammetry to document the excavations, making detailed 3D models of the site as it is being uncovered in order to help excavators understand the complex stratigraphy and inter-relating structures.

Pricing

$99 individual SAA member/ $129 individual non-SAA member

$129 group rate, SAA members/$149 group rate, non-SAA members 

 

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Date/Time

October 30, 2013, 2:00 PM EDT-3:00 PM, Sold Out!

Description

This one-hour online seminar will help both graduate and undergraduate archaeology students and recent graduates in their transition from student to a career.

Objectives

After participating in this online seminar, students will be able to: 1) Identify potential employers. 2) More accurately read and respond to job announcements. 3) Link their current knowledge, skills, and abilities gained in school and in prior jobs to those being sought after by employers.

Instructor

Ms. Carol J. Ellick, RPA, Director of Archaeological and Cultural Education Consultants, holds a B.A. in anthropology from The Evergreen State College (1981) and a M.A. in education, with a specialization in curriculum and instruction, from Chapman University (1992). Ms. Ellick is considered one of the leading experts in archaeological education and the development of public programs in the United States. 

Pricing

FREE to individual SAA members/Not available to individual non-SAA members

 

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